Urban and Regional Policy and Its Effects

Urban and Regional Policy and Its Effects: Building Resilient Regions

MARGARET WEIR
NANCY PINDUS
HOWARD WIAL
HAROLD WOLMAN
Copyright Date: 2012
Pages: 341
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7864/j.ctt12632t
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    Urban and Regional Policy and Its Effects
    Book Description:

    The mission of theUrban and Regional Policy and Its Effectsseries is to inform policymakers, practitioners, and scholars about the effectiveness of select policy approaches, reforms, and experiments in addressing the key social and economic problems facing today's cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas.

    Volume four of the series introduces and examines thoroughly the concept of regional resilience, explaining how resilience can be promoted -or impeded -by regional characteristics and public policies.

    The authors illuminate how the walls that now segment metropolitan regions across political jurisdictions and across institutions -and the gaps that separate federal laws from regional realities -have to be bridged in order for regions to cultivate resilience.

    Contributors: Patricia Atkins, George Washington University; Pamela Blumenthal, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; Sarah Ficenec, George Washington University; Alec Friedhoff, Brookings Institution; Kathryn Foster, University at Buffalo, SUNY; Juliet Gainsborough, Bentley University; Edward Hill, Cleveland State University; Kate Lowe, Cornell University; John Mollenkopf, Graduate Center, City University of New York; Mai Nguyen, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Manuel Pastor, University of Southern California; Rolf Pendall, Urban Institute; Nancy Pindus, Urban Institute; Sarah Reckhow, Michigan State University; Travis St. Clair, George Washington University; Todd Swanstrom, University of Missouri, St. Louis; Margaret Weir, University of California, Berkeley; Howard Wial, Brookings Institution; Harold Wolman, George Washington University

    eISBN: 978-0-8157-2285-4
    Subjects: Political Science, Business

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  3. Preface
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. 1 Introduction
    (pp. 1-23)
    MARGARET WEIR, NANCY PINDUS, HOWARD WIAL and HAROLD WOLMAN

    Urban and regional policy debates are often long on rhetoric but short on evidence about policy impacts. To redress that imbalance, the Brookings Institution, the George Washington University Institute of Public Policy and the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration, and the Urban Institute held the fourth in a series of annual conferences entitled “Urban and Regional Policy and Its Effects” at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C., on May 20–21, 2010. They were joined by the Building Resilient Regions Network, an interdisciplinary research network sponsored by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and...

  5. 2 In Search of Regional Resilience
    (pp. 24-59)
    KATHRYN A. FOSTER

    A thought experiment: Imagine you are walking down the street one fine spring afternoon. Another stroller happens by and you nod pleasantly, whereupon the stroller hauls off and punches you in the gut. As you lay sprawled on the ground getting your bearings, you wonder, “How resilient am I?”

    We might conclude there is evidence of total resilience—define it as bounceback from a stress—if you hop up, dust yourself off, smile at the strangeness of the world, and head on your way, never to suffer a lingering side effect, such as forever weakened stomach muscles or perpetual fear...

  6. 3 Resilience in the Face of Foreclosures: How National Actors Shape Local Responses
    (pp. 60-99)
    TODD SWANSTROM

    Since 2008 the United States has witnessed mortgage foreclosure rates not seen since the Great Depression. According to one estimate, between 10 and 13 million American homes will face foreclosure by 2014.¹ Because foreclosures were endemic to the financial collapse of 2007–08, most of the national conversation has been about their macroeconomic effects and impacts on broader financial markets. But foreclosures also have local effects, leaving behind disrupted families, devastated communities, distressed municipalities, and damaged regions. My focus here is on efforts to deal with the localplaceeffects of foreclosures; I say little about the impact of foreclosures...

  7. 4 Struggling over Strangers or Receiving with Resilience? The Metropolitics of Immigrant Integration
    (pp. 100-147)
    MANUEL PASTOR and JOHN MOLLENKOPF

    In April 2010 the Arizona legislature passed a law (Senate Bill 1070) that required law enforcement and public agency officials to determine the immigration status of individuals when they had “reasonable suspicion” that they might be undocumented immigrants. A maelstrom of national debate ensued, with advocates of the legislation arguing that the state was right to protect itself against a surge of “illegals,” while opponents suggested that Arizona would soon fall into racial profiling and scare away hard-working legal residents. The only thing that both sides seemed to agree on was that local authorities were taking a long-established federal responsibility...

  8. 5 Bringing Equity to Transit-Oriented Development: Stations, Systems, and Regional Resilience
    (pp. 148-192)
    ROLF PENDALL, JULIET GAINSBOROUGH, KATE LOWE and MAI NGUYEN

    As the United States prepares for the next fifty years of growth, many observers hope that transit-oriented development (TOD) will make regions more resilient in the face of rising fuel prices and demographic change. In some metropolitan areas, the number of households living within a quarter-mile of existing or proposed transit stations is already expected to double. In addition, competition among regions for federal funding to support new fast-rail systems has become increasingly fierce.¹

    But new regional rail systems also pose threats and challenges to low-income people. They can divert scarce resources from other important infrastructure investments and lead to...

  9. 6 Economic Shocks and Regional Economic Resilience
    (pp. 193-274)
    EDWARD HILL, TRAVIS ST. CLAIR, HOWARD WIAL, HAROLD WOLMAN, PATRICIA ATKINS, PAMELA BLUMENTHAL, SARAH FICENEC and ALEC FRIEDHOFF

    Economic shocks to metropolitan economies occur periodically, although the effects of the shocks vary from region to region, as do regions’ adjustment to and recovery from them. In this chapter we examine the nature and extent of the shocks, their effects on regional economies (some regional economies are resistant to shocks while others suffer substantial downturns), and the resilience of regional economies to shocks. We are particularly concerned with regional economic resilience: why are some regional economies that are adversely affected by shocks able to recover in a relatively short period of time while others are not?

    Economic resilience is...

  10. 7 Building a Resilient Social Safety Net
    (pp. 275-324)
    SARAH RECKHOW and MARGARET WEIR

    A half century ago, when poverty stood atop the nation’s policy agenda, the federal government launched a remarkable period of institution building. With the declaration of the War on Poverty in 1964, the Office of Economic Opportunity oversaw the creation of community action agencies in cities across the country. The delegation of a national goal to nonprofit neighborhood-based organizations marked a new form of social policy. The organizations created during these formative years became the forerunners of the wide array of community-based nonprofit organizations whose numbers grew dramatically in the subsequent decades. Especially in the fields of affordable housing development,...

  11. Index
    (pp. 325-341)
  12. Backmatter
    (pp. 342-343)