Telecommunications Liberalization on Two Sides of the Atlantic

Telecommunications Liberalization on Two Sides of the Atlantic

Martin Cave
Robert W. Crandall
Copyright Date: 2001
Pages: 89
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7864/j.ctt127z0g
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  • Book Info
    Telecommunications Liberalization on Two Sides of the Atlantic
    Book Description:

    The 1990s witnessed a major revolution in telecommunications policy in North America and Europe. The electronics revolution swept the world, and most countries began to realize that they could not compete in many markets without a vibrant, competitive telecommunications sector. As a result, the European Union, Canada, and the United States launched major new liberalization policies aimed at opening all telecommunications markets to competition. This report presents two views of the progress towards competition -one for North America and one for Europe. The authors provide an overview of the market structure on both continents prior to the 1990s, discuss significant regulatory changes during that decade, and analyze changes in rate structures and competition that have occurred since liberalization. They conclude with a look at the present and future impact of the Internet and other new technologies on the telecommunications industry.

    eISBN: 978-0-8157-9878-1
    Subjects: Technology, Political Science, Business

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. vii-viii)
    Robert W. Hahn and Robert E. Litan

    The United States, Canada, and the European Union have embarked on ambitious programs of liberalization of their telecommunications sectors. The United States led this effort by opening its long-distance market to competition in the 1970s, but it was the enactment of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 that forced open the market for local and intrastate telecommunications. Canada was somewhat slower, liberalizing its long-distance market in 1992 and opening local telecommunications to competition in 1997. Finally, the European Union ordered all member states to begin opening markets to competition on January 1, 1998.

    It is perhaps a little early for definitive...

  4. 1 Telecommunications Policy in North America and Europe
    (pp. 1-7)
    Martin Cave and Robert W. Crandall

    The 1990s witnessed a major revolution in telecommunications policy in North America and Europe. Although telecommunications liberalization had begun in the United States in the 1970s and in the United Kingdom in the mid-1980s, there was no consensus on the need to substitute competition for private or public monopoly on either side of the Atlantic until recently. By the early 1990s, however, the electronics revolution had swept the world, and most countries began to realize that they could not compete in many markets without a vibrant, competitive telecommunications sector. As a result, the European Union, Canada, and the United States...

  5. 2 Telecommunications Policy Reform in the United States and Canada
    (pp. 8-38)
    Robert W. Crandall and Thomas W. Hazlett

    The regulation of telecommunications in the United States and Canada has undergone formidable reform in recent years. Most attention is understandably focused on the United States’ Telecommunications Act of 1996 because it marked a fundamental departure from decades of established regulatory policy. The Telecommunications Act was an official declaration by the Congress of the United States that the basic assumptions of the 1934 Communications Act were defunct. Monopoly market structures are no longer presumptively efficient and best accommodated through common carrier rules and rate regulation. Instead, competition is now to be phased in because it is presumed to be the...

  6. 3 The Liberalization of European Telecommunications
    (pp. 39-78)
    Martin Cave and Luigi Prosperetti

    In this chapter we provide an overview of the liberalization process in European telecommunications and point out what we consider the major items on its agenda for the next few years. Given the comparative nature of this study, we also point out some differences from and common features with the U.S. experience.

    Drawing such parallels is of obvious analytical and practical interest. It also provides some curious insights, as North Americans and Europeans appear to be concerned with opposite sides of the same coin: to dissolve or not to dissolve the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)? To create or not to...

  7. Notes
    (pp. 79-83)
  8. References
    (pp. 85-88)
  9. About the Authors
    (pp. 89-90)
  10. Back Matter
    (pp. 91-91)