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Journal Article

Class Difference and the Reformation of Ontario Public Hospitals, 1900-1935: "Make Every Effort to Satisfy the Tastes of the Well-to-Do"

James M. Wishart
Labour / Le Travail
Vol. 48 (Fall, 2001), pp. 27-61
DOI: 10.2307/25149160
https://www.jstor.org/stable/25149160
Page Count: 35
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Class Difference and the Reformation of Ontario Public Hospitals, 1900-1935: "Make Every Effort to Satisfy the Tastes of the Well-to-Do"
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Abstract

At the beginning of the 20th century, charity hospital governors in Ontario began to explore the possibility of admitting paying patients to help offset the costs of providing medical charity. This transformation entailed changes in administration, as well as concerted publicity and marketing campaigns to rehabilitate the image of the hospital and to attract affluent health consumers. The subsequent construction of new hospital facilities, exclusively for the use of paying customers, was informed by an ideology that mandated the physical separation of social classes and the identification of deserving and less deserving recipients of health care services. This paper examines aspects of the design, management, marketing, and staffing of a number of southern Ontario public hospitals to illustrate how the transformation of these institutions in the years between 1900-1935 actively shaped class inequality within and outside their walls. /// Au début du 20e siècle, les administrateurs des hôpitaux charitables en Ontario ont commencé à explorer la possibilité d'admettre des patients payants pour aider à contrebalancer les coûts de la prestation des services médicaux charitables. Cette transformation a donné lieu à des changements dans l'administration, ainsi qu'à des campagnes publicitaires et commerciales concertées, afin d'améliorer l'image de l'hôpital et d'attirer les consommateurs fortunés. La construction subséquente de nouvelles installations hospitalières dont l'usage était réservé aux clients payants s'est inspirée d'une idéologie qui entraînait la séparation physique des classes sociales et l'identification des récipiendaires des services de soins de santé méritants et moins méritants. Cet article permet d'examiner les aspects de la conception, de la gestion, de la commercialisation et la dotation en personnel de plusieurs hôpitaux publics du sud de l'Ontario et aide à montrer la manière dont la transformation des ces établissements dans les années entre 1900 et 1935 a favorisé de façon remarquable l'inégalité des classes à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de ces établissements.