If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Southern Europeans in Australia: Problems of Assimilation

Charles Price
The International Migration Review
Vol. 2, No. 3 (Summer, 1968), pp. 3-26
DOI: 10.2307/3002619
https://www.jstor.org/stable/3002619
Page Count: 24
Were these topics helpful?

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($26.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Your search terms occurs 8 times in this item.
Southern Europeans in Australia: Problems of Assimilation
Preview not available

Abstract

The search for a clearer definition of the concept and the social implications of immigrants' integration is constantly renewed. Price extends his analysis to a number of different variables affecting and measuring integration or assimilation, including: urban concentration, the role of the ethnic community, intermarriages, political involvement, the important function of the churches, and intergenerational conflict. The experience of America is often compared with that of Australia. Although non-British ethnic groups make up only 20 percent of the Australia population, a one type melting pot seems impossible. Rather, the Author observes that some groupings are emerging according to religious affiliation. Nobody, however, can predict the exact period of time needed for total integration and the process will probably cover several generations.