If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

The Preservation of Music and Irish Cultural History

Harry White
International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music
Vol. 27, No. 2 (Dec., 1996), pp. 123-138
DOI: 10.2307/3108342
https://www.jstor.org/stable/3108342
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Your search terms occurs 3 times in this item.
The Preservation of Music and Irish Cultural History
Preview not available

Abstract

The preservation of traditional music in Ireland may be regarded initially as the outgrowth of antiquarian interest from within the Protestant Ascendancy. With the development of a nationalist political consciousness in the nineteenth century however, music in Ireland rapidly assumed symbolic connotations of emancipation and artistic regeneration which ironically inhibited the growth of an independent art music. The preservation of the ethnic repertory consolidated the notion of Irish music as an immutable fact of the past which could inspire the present in terms of extra-musical thought (political and literary) but which silenced the claim of an original art music upon the Irish mind. Unlike the cross-fertilization of ethnic and art traditions represented by Bartók's achievement in Hungary, the polarised condition of music in Ireland has meant that the preservation of one tradition (represented in the first instance by the great collectors) has not particularly enhanced the cultivation of the other.