If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Social and Cultural Meanings of Student Revolt: Some Informal Comparative Observations

Richard Flacks
Social Problems
Vol. 17, No. 3 (Winter, 1970), pp. 340-357
DOI: 10.2307/799554
https://www.jstor.org/stable/799554
Page Count: 18
Were these topics helpful?

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Your search terms occurs one time in this item.
Social and Cultural Meanings of Student Revolt: Some Informal Comparative Observations
Preview not available

Abstract

A new middle class has emerged, composed of persons who have achieved affluence and secure status in occupations oriented to intellectual and cultural work. Families in this stratum rear children with values and character structures which are at some variance with the dominant culture. Such youth are especially sensitized to social questions, are repelled by acquisitive and nationalistic values, and strive for a vocational situation which maximizes autonomy and self-expression. This sector of the youth population has been the primary constituency for the American student movement of the 1960's. Although the situation of these youth differs from that found in other countries with significant student movements, there are important resemblances between the two. A comparative analysis of student movements suggests that their emergence is a precursor of major qualitative societal and cultural change.