Mycenaean Messenia and the Kingdom of Pylos

Mycenaean Messenia and the Kingdom of Pylos

Richard Hope Simpson
Volume: 45
Copyright Date: 2014
Published by: INSTAP Academic Press
Pages: 122
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1287h0q
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  • Book Info
    Mycenaean Messenia and the Kingdom of Pylos
    Book Description:

    This study outlines the state of our present knowledge concerning the Mycenaean settlements in Messenia and examines the evidence for reconstructing the political geography of the “Kingdom” of Pylos. The progress of archaeological exploration in Messenia is reviewed in relation to the Mycenaean (Late Helladic [LH]) period. The data from excavations and surveys concerning the Mycenaean settlements in Messenia are summarized. The author attempts to determine the extent of the “Kingdom” and to identify the locations of its main districts by correlating the archaeological data from Mycenaean sites with the the inscriptions in Linear B found in the “Palace of Nestor” at Ano Englianos.

    eISBN: 978-1-62303-351-4
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-v)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vi-vii)
  3. List of Tables in the Text
    (pp. viii-ix)
  4. List of Maps
    (pp. x-xi)
  5. List of Plates
    (pp. xii-xiii)
  6. Preface and Acknowledgments
    (pp. xiv-xv)
  7. List of Abbreviations
    (pp. xvi-xvii)
  8. Introduction
    (pp. 1-4)

    The aims of this study are to outline the state of our present knowledge concerning the Mycenaean settlements in Messenia, and to examine the evidence for reconstructing the political geography of the “Kingdom” of Pylos. Chapter 1 reviews the progress of archaeological exploration in Messenia relating to the Mycenaean (Late Helladic [LH]) period. Chapter 2 summarizes the data from excavations and surveys concerning the Mycenaean settlements in Messenia. Chapter 3 attempts to determine the extent of the “Kingdom,” and to identify the locations of its main districts by correlating the archaeological data from the Mycenaean sites with the indications provided...

  9. 1 The History of Exploration
    (pp. 5-14)

    Modern interest in the archaeology of Messenia began with descriptions of ancient remains (e.g., of Messene) by early 19th-century travelers (e.g., Pouqueville, Dodwell, and Gell) following in the footsteps of the ancient writers, particularly Strabo and Pausanias. The only serious fieldwork undertaken at the time was that of theExpedition Scientifique de Morée(Bory de Saint-Vincent et al. 1831–1838; cf. McDonald 1972, 9–11; McDonald and Rapp 1972, 259–260). Later in the century one very popular subject was ancient Koryphasion, both as a candidate for Homer’s Pylos and as the site of the naval battle between Athens and...

  10. 2 Mycenaean Sites in Messenia
    (pp. 15-44)

    The core of this chapter consists of a register of the known Mycenaean sites in Messenia and a commentary outlining the present state of exploration.

    For the earlier Mycenaean periods, LH I to LH IIIA1, our evidence often comes only from tombs. Both excavation and survey have thrown the most light on the LH IIIA2 and LH IIIB periods, which are represented by diagnostic sherds at most of the Mycenaean habitation sites found by survey. At almost all of the early Mycenaean settlements it appears that occupation continued into LH IIIB, and it may be assumed that most of the...

  11. 3 The Political Geography of the Kingdom of Pylos
    (pp. 45-70)

    The Mycenaean clay tablets in the Linear B syllabic script differ in some respects from the written records of the ancient Near East. “[T]hey preserve no laws, no literature, no diplomatic or private correspondence” (Shelmerdine 1998a, 89). They consist of administrative inventories, especially concerning numbers and quantities of commodities, taxes, and personnel, at or to and from various locations, or belonging to named places or persons. The tablets found at Pylos in the “Palace of Nestor” are mainly confined to accounts of only one year of a palace administration (i.e., its last year), with occasional references to the previous year...

  12. References
    (pp. 71-78)
  13. Index of Sites and Geographical Features
    (pp. 79-82)
  14. General Index
    (pp. 83-84)
  15. Maps
    (pp. None)
  16. Plates
    (pp. None)