Review of Allied Health Education: 3

Review of Allied Health Education: 3

Joseph Hamburg General Editor
Darrel J. Mase
J. Warren Perry
Mary Dulmage Managing Editor
Copyright Date: 1979
Pages: 168
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130htsm
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  • Book Info
    Review of Allied Health Education: 3
    Book Description:

    A valuable appraisal of current developments in the rapidly expanding field of allied health education is provided in these nine original articles by leaders in the field. Most of the articles examine specific areas of training -- programs for emergency medical technicians, nurse practitioners, rehabilitation counselors, respiratory therapists, dietitians, and social workers. Others are focused more generally on the burgeoning field of allied health education as a whole. This series seeks, through enlightened and descriptive commentary, to help bind the health professions into a true alliance, and to guide those entering training for careers of human service.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6312-3
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vi-vi)
    Joseph Hamburg, Darrel J. Mase and J. Warren Perry
  4. THE NEXT DECADE: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES
    (pp. 1-14)
    J. Warren Perry

    A quarter-century ago Arnold Toynbee, the great British social philosopher, predicted that the twentieth century would be chiefly remembered as “an age in which human society dared to think of the welfare of the whole human race as a practical objective.”

    High on any list of thinkers and innovators who sought the accomplishment of this goal would be Mary Elizabeth Switzer, beloved champion of handicapped and disadvantaged people everywhere. Mary Switzer was my boss for six years, my colleague in many professional pursuits, and my friend. One of her favorite quotations, attributed to Victor Hugo, was: “Greater than the tread...

  5. THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
    (pp. 15-34)
    Joseph Kadish

    Remarkable improvement and expansion in emergency medical service has occurred throughout the United States in the past decade or so. Federal, state, and local governments, as well as private institutions and various professional organizations, have all participated in developing a system for delivering prompt medical care to victims of accidents and sudden illness. As a result, thousands of lives are being saved every year by technicians and professionals trained in life-saving methods, using modern equipment and the resources of hospital emergency departments and specialized services.

    While this achievement is recognized as significant in every way, and particularly so in the...

  6. CONSUMER HEALTH EDUCATION: A NEW-OLD CHALLENGE TO ALLIED HEALTH EDUCATION
    (pp. 35-44)
    Anne R. Somers

    On June 23, 1976, President Ford signed into law Public Law 94-317. Title I, the National Consumer Health Information and Health Promotion Act of 1976, provides for a national program of “health information, health promotion, preventive health services, and education in the appropriate use of health care.” The Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare was instructed to formulate national goals and a strategy to achieve such goals with respect to these four broad areas. The law also called for a new Office of Health Information and Health Promotion within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OHIHP) with authority...

  7. NURSE PRACTITIONER EDUCATION
    (pp. 45-60)
    Loretta C. Ford

    In a recent survey by C. E. Lewis in theNew England Journal of Medicine, the utilization of nonphysicians, including the nurse practitioner, was identified by some members of the Institute of Medicine as the second most important innovation in health care delivery of the past quarter-century (the most important being organizational innovations such as health maintenance organizations).¹

    Yet just twelve years ago, the namenurse practitionerhad not been applied to those engaged in a form of nursing preparation and practice once considered deviant. Today the nurse practitioner is rapidly becoming the accepted norm for professional nursing. Undergraduate and...

  8. THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING OF REHABILITATION COUNSELORS
    (pp. 61-98)
    Marceline E. Jaques, Dwight R. Kauppi, Joseph M. Steger and Gregory A. Lofaro

    Since the first person was hired full time on public funds as a vocational rehabilitation worker in 1918 (Obermann 1965), the general objectives of the field of rehabilitation counseling have expanded in several directions. This expansion has led to a number of different programs of education and training which can best be understood by examining them from several perspectives. This chapter discusses the principles of rehabilitation as they relate to counseling, the work and work setting of counselors, and the education and training programs that have evolved.

    A few interrelated concepts and assumptions can serve to describe rehabilitation philosophy and...

  9. DEVELOPMENT, ISSUES, AND EDUCATION IN RESPIRATORY THERAPY
    (pp. 99-115)
    Stephen N. Collier and John W. Youtsey

    Respiratory therapy as an allied health profession has achieved some public understanding only in the past few years. If the respiratory therapist was once thought to be engaged in “something to do with breathing,” it is now rather widely known that his functions spread over the whole spectrum of pulmonary diseases and cardiopulmonary life-support systems. At least some of the procedures within the field have gained general visibility.

    Today’s respiratory therapist is a well-trained individual who provides critical-care technology in acute situations involving sophisticated life-support systems, as well as filling the traditional role of therapist in cases involving rehabilitation from...

  10. REVOLUTION IN DIETETIC EDUCATION
    (pp. 116-128)
    Maxine Hart

    Nutrition is in the limelight! There are sound reasons for this, including increasing evidence of a direct relationship between health and nutrition and growing public awareness of the sociological, psychological, and economic factors that influence people’s food choices and ultimately affect their nutritional status. Diseases in which nutrition is increasingly implicated as a key factor are the major health problems in the United States: they include ischemic heart disease, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, and other chronic diseases. The relationship of nutrition to these diseases is complex, and not always agreed upon, but the evidence for a relationship is so strong that...

  11. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SETTING
    (pp. 129-147)
    Dorothy A. Miller and Constance P. Wilson

    The practice of social work is an inextricable part of health care, since physical well-being and social environment are equally important in determining the quality of life. A comprehensive concept of health needs was given little recognition until recently. Instead, emphasis was placed on one aspect or another according to the particular interests of the most powerful medical or health group of the time, the state of relevant knowledge (biology, psychology, physiology, the social sciences), and the existing philosophical, economic, and political climate.

    Man’s spiritual or psychosocial state cannot be seen or described in the same concrete way as his...

  12. PREPARING INSTRUCTORS FOR THE HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONS
    (pp. 148-156)
    R. D. Kingston

    The demand for quality, quantity, and sophistication in health care systems has grown phenomenally in the past two decades. This demand has created a need for more than 250 different types of health care professionals, many requiring special educational preparation. Projections for the next fifteen years indicate that health care will employ more personnel than any other industry in the United States. Both present and projected needs have drawn attention to the question, “Who will accept the responsibility for preparing the needed health care professionals?”

    Traditionally, hospitals have borne this teaching burden. Recently, however, other institutions (such as community colleges,...

  13. CONTRIBUTORS & EDITORS
    (pp. 157-161)