Rock Art Of Kentucky

Rock Art Of Kentucky

FRED E. COY
THOMAS C. FULLER
LARRY G. MEADOWS
JAMES L. SWAUGER
Copyright Date: 1997
Pages: 192
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130hv8b
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  • Book Info
    Rock Art Of Kentucky
    Book Description:

    Rock Art of Kentuckyis the first comprehensive documentation of the fragile remnants of Kentucky's prehistoric Native American rock art sites. Found in twenty-two of Kentucky's counties, these sites pan a period of more than three thousand years. The most frequent design elements in Kentucky rock art are engravings of the footprints of birds, quadrupeds, and humans. Other design elements include anthropomorphs, mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, and abstract and geometric figures. Included in the book are stunning illustrations of the sixty confirmed sites and ten destroyed or questionable sites.

    In the thirty some years during which this information was collected, there has been an alarming deterioration of many of the sites. Ancient carvings have been destroyed by graffiti or have lost extensive detail because of climatic or environmental conditions, such as acid rain. Although all the Kentucky sites are officially listed on the National register of Historic Places, several no long exist or are at present inaccessible. In addition to making data available for the first time to the national and international archaeological community for further comparative and interpretive studies,Rock Art of Kentuckyis also for nonspecialists interested in prehistoric Kentucky and Native American studies.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-5838-9
    Subjects: History, Archaeology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  3. SPONSOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
    David L. Morgan
  4. PREFACE
    (pp. xi-xvi)
    Fred E. Coy Jr.
  5. 1 INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-10)

    Archaeologists use the term “artifact” to describe the material remains of human activity by extinct cultures. Artifacts include such diverse items as stone tools, human skeletons, ceramic shards from cooking pots, animal bones discarded from meals, ornaments of bone, shell, and other natural materials, and engraved or painted symbols or drawings on boulders, rock outcrops, and the walls of caves, rockshelters, or cliffs.

    These latter artifacts, called “petroglyphs” and “pictographs,” are the subject of this book. Petroglyphs are designs engraved on rocks by carving, pecking, rubbing, or a combination of these methods. (See the glossary for more detailed definitions of...

  6. 2 NATIVE AMERICAN SITES
    (pp. 11-136)

    LOCATION: Breckinridge County, north of Mattingly and south of Cloverport, on the Mattingly Quadrangle, in a rockshelter in a small valley near the western bank of Caney Creek; the rockshelter faces generally to the north, where a small, wet-weather stream joins the creek (Coy and Fuller 1966, 54). Elevation: 160 m (520 ft).

    DESCRIPTION: The rockshelter measures 6 m (20 ft) in width, 2.5 m (8 ft) in height and 2.5 m (8 ft) in depth (Fig. 1) and is open on three sides. A large rock measuring 6 m (20 ft) in length, 2 m (6.5 ft) in width...

  7. 3 DESTROYED OR QUESTIONABLE SITES
    (pp. 137-146)

    LOCATION: Ballard County, reportedly in a red sandstone bed on Cane Creek, north of Cane Creek Church and west northwest of Harrison Hughes Cemetery on the Wickliffe Quadrangle. It was just downstream from the bridge over Cane Creek. Elevation: about 110 m (350 ft).

    DESCRIPTION: The only available information for this site is a written description from the late nineteenth century. R.H. Loughridge published a detailed description and an illustration of the petroglyphs (Fig. 173) in 1888. It is reprinted in its entirety here:

    Foot-prints in Sandstone. A locality of very special interest occurs a couple of miles northeast of...

  8. 4 CONCLUSIONS
    (pp. 147-156)

    The investigations of the petroglyphs and pictographs in Kentucky resulted in the compilation of numerous sites exhibiting a variety of designs and motifs. In general, these examples of Native American rock art share many similarities with other sites documented in Ohio and Pennsylvania (Swauger 1974, 1984).

    The rock art sites described in this book provide the necessary data to answer many of the questions we had about the petroglyphs of Kentucky. We now know the spatial distribution of Native American petroglyphs within Kentucky. Also, considerable information has been compiled on sites that no longer exist or are not currently accessible....

  9. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 157-158)
  10. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 159-164)
  11. INDEX
    (pp. 165-176)