Review of Allied Health Education: 2

Review of Allied Health Education: 2

Darrel J. Mase
J. Warren Perry
Mary Dulmage Managing Editor
Joseph Hamburg General Editor
Copyright Date: 1977
Pages: 200
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130j2w0
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Review of Allied Health Education: 2
    Book Description:

    This volume of essays, like the first in the series, examines trends in the educational programs for the many related, but traditionally separate, allied health professions. With the phenomenal growth of these fields and the rapidly changing requirements of available technology, educators and counselors alike are in constant need of the kind of up-to-date information offered in these essays. Areas covered in this volume include anesthesia assistance, medical records administration, environmental health, mental health, physical therapy, and health services administration.. In addition there are general essays on such topics as clinical education of allied health professionals and the setting of standards for licensing and certification.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6313-0
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-x)
    Joseph Hamburg, Darrel J. Mase and Warren J. Perry
  4. UNIVERSITY EDUCATION FOR NONPHYSICIAN HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN ANESTHESIA
    (pp. 1-18)
    M. F. Rhoton and J. S. Gravenstein

    Several groups have attempted to determine present and future manpower needs in anesthesia. They have found that serious shortages exist now and predict more in the years ahead.¹ Though their opinions differ about the best ways to solve present and threatened manpower problems, few deny they exist. Furthermore, the future probably does not hold the expectation that current requirements will diminish.² Continued advances in technology and the likelihood of naturally occurring increases in demands for new anesthesia services seem assured. Three observations can be cited to support the claim that in the foreseeable future nonphysician personnel will be needed to...

  5. NEW DIRECTIONS IN REGULATING HEALTH MANPOWER
    (pp. 19-34)
    Harris S. Cohen

    The American health care system is currently undergoing a silent revolution as characterized by the growing number of social controls either adopted or under consideration. The first decade of Medicare and Medicaid has ushered into our experience a brand new set of policies, programs, and mechanisms that represent both quantitatively and qualitatively a great leap forward in health care regulation. The momentum of this new trend is already stretching the coping capacity of the system and will probably not slow down until the system converts, at some future time, to national health insurance.

    We will examine a number of new...

  6. EDUCATION FOR THE MEDICAL RECORD PROFESSION
    (pp. 35-53)
    Mary Vita Pandolfo

    Aristotle expressed a principle that tends to surprise us today because it reflects what we like to consider a contemporary social consciousness. “Health of mind and body,” he said, “is so fundamental to the good life that if we believe men have any personal rights as human beings, they have an absolute right to the measure of good health that society is able to give them.” In response to the needs of our modern medical technology, this same ancient sentiment has helped to generate a veritable army of allied health professionals. Among them are the medical record practitioners.

    The keeping...

  7. VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION: A MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR TO HEALTH OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION
    (pp. 54-76)
    Elizabeth E. Kerr

    Dynamic social changes and dramatic health science and technology advances continue to propel our nation’s health care delivery system to new dimensions and frontiers. They have given rise to a service-oriented society that is requiring more and better-prepared personnel, able to cope with technological progress and rapid skill obsolescence.

    Today the people of this country believe that adequate health care in all its aspects-preventive, therapeutic, convalescent, and custodial-is no longer a privilege for some but, rather, a right of every individual. Emanating from this tenet is a national thrust to assure the provision of comprehensive health care to all and...

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION
    (pp. 77-114)
    Jack B. Hatlen

    Environmental health is a relatively new subject in academe. It has evolved from the subject area called sanitary science, which had its origins in the reduction of disease transmission through control of our food supply, drinking water, waste disposal, and other components of our environment. The application of sanitary science principles is called sanitation, and the specialist in the application of these principles and the practice of sanitation is the sanitarian.

    Environmental health is a newer and more inclusive term, now in more common use than sanitation or sanitary science. This change in language has evolved along with changes in...

  9. A REVIEW OF CLINICAL EDUCATION IN ALLIED HEALTH
    (pp. 115-128)
    Keith D. Blayney

    Perhaps the most difficult aspect of education for the allied health professions is the appropriate development of the clinical portion of the student’s training rather than that achieved in the classroom or laboratory. For this reason, it seems ironic that in the past decade so much effort and money have been expended on increasing the quality of on-campus education, while very little attention has been paid to comparable improvement of clinical education. Unfortunately, it is the rule rather than the exception that students are “dumped” into a clinical setting with little guidance given to the clinical faculty as to what...

  10. MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORTIVE PERSONNEL
    (pp. 129-147)
    Harold L. McPheeters

    The field of mental health has experienced a series of remarkable changes over the past ten to fifteen years. Originally it was concerned only with the treatment of the mentally ill, the emotionally disturbed, and the mentally retarded. Little more than a decade ago, agency settings for mental health services were large mental hospitals, schools for the retarded, psychiatric outpatient clinics, psychiatric units in general hospitals, and the offices of private practicing psychiatrists.

    All these agencies were considered to be part of a medical treatment system in which the psychiatrist, a physician, directed the efforts of members of the other...

  11. PHYSICAL THERAPY EDUCATION
    (pp. 148-159)
    Rosemary M. Scully

    Physical therapy as a field of study in the United States beginning almost sixty years ago. But physical therapy as a art has been recognized as an essential element in treatment of man’s physical ills since ancient times.

    Sunlight, warmth, and “rubbing” have always been lessen the effects of disease and injury. Electric shock for and baths, massage, and gymnastics for other were important treatments in early Greek and Roman cultures. Yet it was not until World war I that physical therapy’s came to be fully appreciated in the United States, when recognized as an important aid in decreasing convalescence...

  12. EDUCATION IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
    (pp. 160-168)
    Richard M. Magraw

    Since Medicare came into legal being a decade ago, many educators, planners, public policy-makers, and even practitioners have looked impatiently on the turbulent health care scene for progress in developing programs for professional teamwork in everyday medical care. They have been disappointed. When the Medicare legislation was passed in 1965, and for some time thereafter, Department of Health, Education and Welfare plans for meeting an inevitable growth of demand for services were based on a greatly enhanced use of professional teams and professional auxiliaries. As of 1975, nothing like the anticipated progress had occurred.

    This failure suggests unrealistic expectations, planning,...

  13. EDUCATION FOR HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
    (pp. 169-185)
    Gary L. Filerman and Stephen F. Loebs

    Health services administration is concerned with the organizational and financial requirements to provide effective personal health services: the organizational modalities in which the services are provided, the financial structures necessary to sustain them and their efficiency and effectiveness.

    The provision of personal health services serves as the focal point. It refers to the ways by which health services, usually provided on a one-to-one basis, are made available to the population in a variety of organizational settings. Personal health services are effective when they are appropriate, of high quality, and accessible at the lowest possible cost.

    In recent years the nation’s...

  14. CONTRIBUTORS & EDITORS
    (pp. 186-190)