The Correspondence of Washington Allston

The Correspondence of Washington Allston

NATHALIA WRIGHT Editor
Copyright Date: 1993
Pages: 712
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130j42j
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  • Book Info
    The Correspondence of Washington Allston
    Book Description:

    Washington Allston (1779-1843), the first major American artist trained in Europe, produced important paintings, explored sculpture and architecture, and published poetry and art criticism. On his return to America he became influential in the cultural and intellectual life of New England. Allston "knew everyone" and corresponded with many of the leading figures of his day, including Wordsworth, Longfellow, Irving, Sully, and Morse.Nathalia Wright's edition is the most comprehensive work to date on Allston, bringing together all known letters by and to him and describing his principal activities in years for which correspondence is lacking. Allston holds an important place in the history of American culture and European art and has long deserved such a volume, which offers a fascinating view of the world of arts and letters during the early American flowering.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6504-2
    Subjects: Art & Art History, Language & Literature, History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-v)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vi-vii)
  3. List of Illustrations
    (pp. viii-viii)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-xi)
  5. TEXTS AND EDITORIAL POLICY
    (pp. xii-xv)
  6. ABBREVIATIONS, SHORT TITLES, AND SOURCES
    (pp. xvi-xvii)
  7. CHRONOLOGY OF WASHINGTON ALLSTON’S LIFE
    (pp. xviii-xx)
  8. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-4)

    In the history of American culture Washington Allston occupies a unique position as both artist and writer. Many other artists—Thomas Cole, Rembrandt Peale, Horatio Greenough, William Page, and William Wetmore Story, for example—wrote for publication, and several writers—among them Washington Irving, E.E. Cummings, John Dos Passos, William Carlos Williams, and Sherwood Anderson—drew or painted. Allston’s achievement in both areas, however, is without parallel. Literature and art are, moreover, intimately interwoven in both his paintings and his writing.

    Allston was the first American to rely solely on his art for his livelihood. As the first important painter...

  9. THE CORRESPONDENCE, With Editorial Links
    (pp. 5-528)

    Newport¹

    [1795 before 22 March]²

    Give my love to Ned,³ and tell him that I have at last finished “Mount Vesuvius.”⁴

    [RHD said this sentence was the close of this letter and that in it Allston related a dream he had of “walking slowly on the hill in Newport, and seeing a spacious mansion, overshadowed by a lofty elm—nature and art in rivalry set all off with bowers and woodbine—a fair lady in a bower, who blushes at seeing him, then comes forward, and he falls upon his knees before her, while she confesses to having perceived an...

  10. Paintings of Washington Allston
    (pp. None)
  11. APPENDICES
  12. Selected Bibliography
    (pp. 647-648)
  13. Index
    (pp. 649-682)