Appalachian Women

Appalachian Women: An Annotated Bibliography

SIDNEY SAYLOR FARR
Copyright Date: 1981
Pages: 208
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130j4gr
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  • Book Info
    Appalachian Women
    Book Description:

    Appalachian women have been the subject of song, story, and report for nearly two centuries. Now for the first time a fully annotated bibliography makes accessible this large body of literature. Works covered include novels, short stories, magazine articles, manuscripts, dissertations, surveys, and oral history tapes -- altogether over 1,200 items.

    The annotated listings are grouped under broad subject headings, including biography, coal mining, education, fiction, health care, industry, migrants, music, poetry, and religion. An author/title/subject index provides easy access to the listings.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6298-0
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. ix-xii)
    Alfred H. Perrin

    In a special way this annotated list of over a thousand books, short stories, magazine articles, and oral history tapes concerning Appalachian women is a personal, pioneer effort. The compiler was born and raised on Stoney Fork near Pineville in Eastern Kentucky. She lived as a girl in an isolated mountain hollow, later in small towns and in a large city outside of Kentucky. She has by years of effort and desire read herself into an education. She was married at age fifteen. For some time now, she, her second husband, and her son have been involved in the academic...

  4. Preface
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  5. SUBJECTS
    • Autobiography & Biography
      (pp. 1-24)

      1. Adams, Robert G.Nancy Ward, Beautiful Woman of Two Worlds. Chattanooga, Tenn.: Hampton House, 1979.

      A biography of Nancy Ward, a Cherokee princess born and raised in what is now known as East Tennessee. Nancy played a significant role in the history and development of Tennessee.

      2. Agee, James. “Emma’s Story: Two Versions.”Sou. Expos. 7 (Spring 1979): 8–17.

      Agee writes of Emma, 18 years old, married for two years to a man old enough to be her father. A tender, poignant description of a young Alabama girl and the two men (a writer and a photographer) who entered her...

    • Coal Mining
      (pp. 24-33)

      209. Addington, Luther F. “Flowers.”Mt. Life&Work36 (Summer 1960): 36–38.

      About an Appalachian black woman whose husband was a miner. He was shot and killed in the fall; she died during the winter. A neighbor, a white man, kept working in her flowers the next spring and summer: “She was a lover of flowers … so … I’ve come to hoe her flowers.”

      210. Ansley, Fran, and Thrasher, Sue. “The Ballad of Barney Graham.”Sou. Expos. 4, no. 1 & 2 (1976): 137–42.

      An interview with the woman who wrote the ballad about her father gives us an insight into...

    • Education
      (pp. 33-40)

      279. Ambrose, Luther. “A Mountain Mother.”Mt. Life&Work4 (Apr. 1928): 21–28.

      A true story about Ambrose’s mother, a remarkable mountain woman. She raised a large family, all of whom were educated. To help earn desperately needed money, she began experimenting in weaving. Later she instructed workers at Berea College in the art of weaving, and Fireside Industries was born.

      280. ―. “To Read, To Learn.”Mt. Life&Work45 (Sept. 1969): 13–17.

      A tribute to the author’s mother and her zeal for learning—a zeal triumphant over circumstances that are now part of legend.

      281. Anderson, Rufus.Memoir of Catherine Brown,...

    • Fiction & Drama
      (pp. 40-98)

      331. Addington, Luther F.The Little Fiddler of Laurel Cove. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1960.

      Written primarily for children, this book tells of the efforts of a young girl and her brother to attend high school.

      332. ―.Sugar in the Gourd. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1961.

      The title of the book is also the title of a mountain fiddle tune. A young girl wants to help her family in a special way.

      333. Agee, James.A Death in the Family. New York: Avon, 1938.

      This novel deals with death and how different members of the family handle the loss of a loved one. Mary Follet, a...

    • Health Conditions & Health Care
      (pp. 98-106)

      799. “Amanda’s Salve.”Foxfire10 (Fall 1976): 218-20.

      From beef tallow, salve is made for use on any kind of infection or sore. The making and use of this salve are described by a mountain woman who, at the same time, reveals much about herself.

      800. Anderson, Elsie. “Our Life with Grandmother, Rebecca Caudill Tackett.”Appal. Heritage6 (Summer 1978): 11–12.

      A woman remembers when her grandmother was ill and the family moved in to help to take care of her. A good glimpse of an old woman, a young wife and mother, and a young girl.

      801. Ballangee, Judith. “Lend-a-Hand Lives...

    • Industry
      (pp. 107-109)

      866. Ansley, Fran and Bell, Brenda. “Diagnosis: Work-Related Disease.”Mt. Life and Work50 (June 1974): 13–16.

      Certain health and safety hazards face women in Appalachia who work in garment factories and cotton mills.

      867. “Appalachian Women’s Rights Organization Forms.”Mt. Life&Work51 (Mar. 1975): 28–30.

      On February 16, 1975, a meeting took place in Floyd County, Kentucky, in which women spoke out about various aspects of their lives and labor. The conclusion many seemed to arrive at was that women are strong fighters but need the support of other women.

      868. Arnow, Harriette S. “Progress Reached Our Valley.”Nation211...

    • Life Styles
      (pp. 109-121)

      884. Alther, Lisa. “They Shall Take Up Serpents.”New York Times Mag. June 6, 1976, pp. 18–20, 28, 35.

      The author ofKinflicksinterviews the pastor and members of the Holiness Church of God in Jesus Name of Carson Springs, Tennessee. Photographs of snake handling and descriptions of experiences show the involvement of mountain women in this religious rite.

      885. Angier, Suzanne. “Florence and Lawton.”Foxfire7 (Fall 1973): 192–208, 225–27.

      A mountain couple remember their youth, adventures, and way of life.

      886. “Annie Perry.”Foxfire9 (Summer–Fall 1975): 143–62.

      Through interviews conducted over a four-year period, the...

    • Migrants
      (pp. 121-124)

      977. Alexander, Patricia. “I Am Home.”Appal. Women1 (Fall 1979): 17.

      The poet, a Tennessee woman, writes this poem about living in Chicago and traveling home to the hills and her mother.

      978. Ansley, Fran, and Thrasher, Sue. “The Ballad of Barney Graham.”Sou. Expos. 4, no. 1 & 2 (1976): 137–42.

      An interview with the woman who wrote the ballad about her father gives us an insight into her own character. She talks about the United Mine Workers, her father’s death at the hands of company thugs, the hardships she and her family endured, and their migration to Ohio.

      1003....

    • Music
      (pp. 124-129)

      1002. Ansley, Fran and Thrasher, Sue. “The Ballad of Barney Graham.”Sou. Expos. 4, no. 1 & 2 (1976): 137–42.

      An interview with the woman who wrote the ballad about her father gives us an insight into her own character. She talks about the United Mine Workers, her father’s death at the hands of company thugs, the hardships she and her family endured, and their migration to Ohio.

      1003. “Aunt Sal’s Song.”Appal. Heritagel (Spring 1973): 8–10.

      The verses of this song are given, along with photographs of Uncle William Creech, Aunt Sally Creech, and handmade relics.

      1004. Baker, Edna Ritchie....

    • Oral History
      (pp. 129-153)

      Note: All items in this section consist of tapes and transcripts. The place listed in the heading indicates where the tape is deposited. Tapes and transcripts can be obtained by writing to the campus director of the Appalachian Oral History Project at the school that conducted the interview.

      1039. Adams, Malinda. Emory, Va.: Emory and Henry Coll. Aug. 1973. 60 min.; 12 pp. Cynthia Legard, interviewer.

      Adams was born in 1920 and lives in Saltville, Virginia. She discusses her role as a housewife, her crocheting and quilting, railroads, and box socials.

      1040. Adkins, Susie. Pippa Passes, Ky.: Alice Lloyd Coll. Aug. 9,...

    • Poetry
      (pp. 153-156)

      1227. Alexander, Patricia. “I Am Home.”Appal. Women1 (Fall 1979): 17.

      The poet, a Tennessee woman, writes about living in Chicago and traveling home to the hills and her mother.

      1228. Amburgey, Gail; Coleman, Mary Joan; and Hansel, Paulette.We’re Alright But We Ain’t Special. Beckley, W.V.: Soupbean Productions, Mountain Union Books, 1976.

      This book of poems is a collaboration of three mountain poets. Amburgey and Coleman are West Virginia natives, and Hansel was born and raised in Eastern Kentucky.

      1229. Bernard, Jacqueline. “Mountain Voices: Appalachian Poets.”Ms. 5 (Aug. 1976): 34, 36–38.

      Four women who participated in the First Conference...

    • Religion & Folklore
      (pp. 156-161)

      1256. Agee, James.A Death in the Family. New York: Avon, 1938.

      This novel deals with death and how different members of the family handle the loss of a loved one. Mary Follet, a Tennessee woman, is portrayed convincingly and with sensitivity.

      1257. Alther, Lisa. “They Shall Take Up Serpents.”New York Times Mag., June 6, 1976, pp. 18–20, 28, 35.

      The author ofKinflicksinterviews the pastor and members of the Holiness Church of God in Jesus Name of Carson Springs, Tennessee. Photographs of snake-handling and descriptions of experiences show the involvement of mountain women in this religious rite.

      885....

    • Studies & Surveys
      (pp. 161-166)

      1292. Anderson, Frances Gaines. “Leisure Time Interests and Activities of Girls in High School.” Master’s thesis, West Virginia Univ., 1942.

      A study in which West Virginia mountain girls are used as a sample group.

      1293.Appalachia in the Sixties: Decade of Reawakening. David S. Walls and John D. Stephenson, eds. Lexington, Ky.: Univ. Press of Kentucky, 1972.

      Articles written by people who have lived with, worked with, and watched the people of Appalachia. The book was compiled as a follow-up to Kennedy’s program in the early 1960s. The following chapters deal with women: “In Hazard,” “Life in Appalachia—The Case of Hugh...

  6. Index
    (pp. 167-187)