Health and Demography in Kentucky

Health and Demography in Kentucky

THOMAS R. FORD
Copyright Date: 1964
Pages: 176
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130j7j7
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  • Book Info
    Health and Demography in Kentucky
    Book Description:

    This comprehensive survey of the changes in Kentucky's population and economy furnishes graphic evidence of the value of demographic data to all who must plan health programs and offers an example to Kentucky and to other states and areas.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6293-5
    Subjects: Population Studies, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. v-viii)
    Robert Straus

    IN 1956, SHORTLY after initial planning for the University of Kentucky Medical Center had begun, the Commonwealth Fund of New York City provided a grant to the University for assistance in planning its Medical Center. One part of the program supported by this grant was a thorough review of the status of demographic data relevant to the health of the people of Kentucky. This study was undertaken with the objectives of determining both what kinds of data were avaliable and their form and location, evaluating them from a methodological point of view and bringing together in a convenient form a...

  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    (pp. ix-x)
    Thomas R. Ford
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. xi-xx)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xxi-xxiv)

    HEALTH, WHETHER we consider it as freedom from disease and defect or as the World Health Organization defines it—“a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being”—is not an isolated phenomenon. Rather, it is determined by the interaction of a complex variety of biological, geographic, psychological, social, and cultural factors. An understanding of these factors and their interplay is essential for the provision of adequate health and medical care.

    Among the factors that must be taken into consideration in the planning of health programs are those of a demographic nature. Demography, broadly conceived as the scientific study of...

  6. 1 POPULATION: GROWTH AND DISTRIBUTION
    (pp. 1-25)

    THE MOST STRIKING feature of the growth of the population of Kentucky is its relatively slow rate of increase. The population of 3,038,156 recorded in the 1960 census was only 3.2 percent greater than the 1950 census population. During the 1950-1960 decade the national population increased by 18.5 percent, and all but four states (North Dakota, Mississippi, Arkansas, and West Virginia) had population growth rates greater than Kentucky. Although the recent intercensal growth rate is the lowest ever recorded for the state, Kentucky’s population growth has lagged behind that of the nation during every decade since 1830, with the exception...

  7. 2 DEMOGRAPHIC COMPOSITION COLOR RACE AGE, AND SEX
    (pp. 26-47)

    A KNOWLEDGE of the growth and distribution of a population is extremely useful for health research and planning operations but seldom adequate in itself since populations of equal size may differ widely in their composition and consequently in their health problems and needs. From readily available census data it is possible to obtain quickly a picture of the composition of a given population and the changes occurring in it. Such information is useful in seeking to understand the underlying social forces producing changes or to anticipate future developments that will have health implications. To choose a ready example, the Kentucky...

  8. 3 SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS MARITAL STATUS, FAMILY STRUCTURE, HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION, EDUCATION, AND MOBILITY
    (pp. 48-72)

    IN THE PLANNING of health programs, consideration must be given to the fact that different groups may vary widely in their social characteristics as well as in their demographic composition. Social data collected in the census do not provide a fully adequate basis for gearing programs to the social and cultural features of particular groups, but they do provide a tremendous amount and variety of information on the characteristics of groups that is invaluable in understanding their behavior. Many of these characteristics, such as the increasing mobility of the population and the growing number of older persons who maintain separate...

  9. 4 ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS INCOME, HOUSING, LABOR FORCE, INDUSTRIAL AND OCCUPATIONAL COMPOSITION
    (pp. 73-101)

    THE LINKAGE between the economic characteristics and the health status of a population is of such vital importance that the latter cannot be fully comprehended without some considerable knowledge of the former. Data collected in the National Health Survey support most previous studies in the finding that health conditions improve and amounts of medical care received increase with level of income. The correlation is a far from perfect one, however, and is complicated by such factors as social values, education, type of work engaged in, and place of residence. The health status of an individual or community is never the...

  10. 5 DEMOGRAPHIC INDICATORS OF HEALTH STATUS
    (pp. 102-130)

    IN NOT ABLE CONTRAST to the importance of health to the social and economic welfare of our society and to the vast sums expended for health and medical purposes is the scarcity of centralized, valid health statistics. On the national level, the establishment of the U.S. National Health Survey in 1956 was a major step in the provision of adequate measures of the health status of the people of the nation. Before its establishment, information on the extent and characteristics of illness was largely derived from reports of selected communicable diseases in compliance with state laws, specialized local health studies...

  11. 6 A SUMMARY REVIEW
    (pp. 131-142)

    HEALTH, HOWEVER defined, is a complex characteristic shaped not only by biological and physical environmental factors but by social, cultural, and economic forces as well. To plan and provide for the health care of a society is at best a difficult matter, but without an understanding of the factors that enter into the health complex, it is virtually impossible. The information that has been presented in the preceding pages is, of course, far from comprehensive, for its purpose was not to cover the entire range of factors necessary to the provision of good health care, but rather to indicate some...

  12. INDEX
    (pp. 143-150)