Review of Allied Health Education: 5

Review of Allied Health Education: 5

Darrel J. Mase
J. Warren Perry
Joseph Hamburg General Editor
Copyright Date: 1985
Pages: 176
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130jcm6
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  • Book Info
    Review of Allied Health Education: 5
    Book Description:

    Ferment and change best describe the health care scene today. Any semblance of stability and controlled evolution in this important area is over for the foreseeable future. Unanticipated and sudden shifts in priorities have occured because of society's concern with the excessive costs, limited access, and restrictive modes of delivery of care in this major industry.

    Volume 5 of this useful and popular series explores in depth a number of these contemporary issues and changes: geriatrics, prospective payment, rural health, health promotion, computerized education, accreditation, and curricular articulation. These original essays will be of interest and importance to all concerned with education in the health professions.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6310-9
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-x)
    Joseph Hamburg, Darrel Mase and Warren Perry
  4. PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT: ITS IMPACT ON ACADEMIC HEALTH CENTERS AND ALLIED HEALTH EDUCATION
    (pp. 1-36)
    Lawrence Abrams and Joseph J. Collins

    Today we stand at the threshold of a new and critical era in the financing and delivery of health care in America. The foundations upon which our existing spectrum of health care delivery services have been developed are being dramatically altered and reshaped. The impact of these changes will undoubtedly be felt throughout the health care community for they will necessitate new and innovative methods of maintaining continued levels of care, developing new programs, and fostering continued growth and vitality.

    Health care education, especially in the areas of allied health and other nonphysician training programs, undoubtedly will also feel the...

  5. ALLIED HEALTH AND THE ELDERLY
    (pp. 37-57)
    Darrel J. Mase

    The termallied healthdoes not encompass a health specialty but a conglomerate of supportive health personnel. This conglomerate reflects not singularity but diversity. The number of occupations and professions included in the field of allied health determines the actual diversity. The term was coined by federal agencies in the late 1960s to describe a large segment of health care providers. On November 24, 1968, at the first annual meeting of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions, now the American Society of Allied Health Professions, I stated, as president, “In 1900 there was one supportive person for each...

  6. HEALTH PROMOTION DISEASE PREVENTION AND THE ROLE OF ALLIED HEALTH
    (pp. 58-82)
    Thomas Robinson

    The human organism employs varying modes of reaction to crisis situations: adaptation, attack, or flight. Each, however, is reactive, as are the rescuers in Don Ardell’s fable entitled “Upstream, Downstream.” This clever allegory vividly describes how the valiant people of Downstream reacted to save swimmers who found themselves in trouble. Although the community downstream adapted mechanisms to rescue and resuscitate those saved from drowning, its reactionary approach becomes painfully unsatisfactory when we shift our frame of reference by asking, What is happening Upstream? Why are all of the swimmers in trouble? Couldn’t the Upstream community prevent the unending flow of...

  7. RURAL HEALTH CARE: CONCERNS FOR PRESENT AND FUTURE
    (pp. 83-106)
    Sam M. Cordes and J. Stephen Wright

    Increasingly, “rural health” is being recognized as a distinct and important component of the larger health care arena. For example, in the past decade at least two national organizations have been established to deal with rural health: American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association. Other organizations have developed subunits to focus on rural health issues; e.g., the American Hospital Association has established a Center for Small or Rural Hospitals.

    Why a separate identity for rural health? This is a legitimate question, and the most basic answer is that the characteristics of rural America, and the implication...

  8. ACCREDITATION IN THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
    (pp. 107-125)
    Frank G. Dickey

    Laurence Sterne, the 18th-century English novelist, in his bookThe Lift and Opinions of Tristram Shandy,tells that the ancient Goths had an interesting custom of debating every major issue twice—once, drunk, so the discussion might not lack vigor, and the second time, sober, so discretion would play a meaningful part in the decision. Over the past seventy years accreditation has been subjected to both kinds of analyses by American educators. Since 1913, when the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools issued its first list of regionally accredited institutions, accreditation has been the primary means of determining...

  9. ARTICULATION OF ALLIED HEALTH EDUCATION
    (pp. 126-139)
    Elizabeth C. King

    Sylvia is twenty-eight years old. She graduated from Silver State Community College seven years ago with an associate degree as a certified occupational therapist assistant (COTA). She has had seven years of work experience as a COTA: three years in a burn care unit in a large tertiary-care center and three years in a stroke rehabilitation unit, and she is currently working in a 300-bed skilled-nursing facility. She loves her work and is committed to the practice of occupational therapy. She would like to complete the requirements for a bachelor’s degree and become an occupational therapist. When she makes an...

  10. MICROCOMPUTERS AND ALLIED HEALTH EDUCATION: DIVERSITY AND POTENTIAL
    (pp. 140-162)
    John L. Phelps

    “We are on the verge of a major change in the way people learn. This change, driven by the personal computer, will affect all levels of education from earliest childhood through adult education. It will affect most subject areas and most learners. It will affect both education and training. It will be one of the few major historical changes in the way people learn. The impact of the computer in education will not produce an incremental change, a minor aberration in the current ways of learning, but will lead to entirely different learning systems.”¹ Given the impact of computers in...

  11. CONTRIBUTORS AND EDITORS
    (pp. 163-165)