Music in English Renaissance Drama

Music in English Renaissance Drama

EDITED BY John H. Long
Nan Cooke Carpenter
Ernest Brennecke
Ian Spink
R. W. Ingram
MacDonald Emslie
Willa McClung Evans
Vincent Duckles
Copyright Date: 1968
Pages: 200
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130jct9
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  • Book Info
    Music in English Renaissance Drama
    Book Description:

    Nowhere is the richness and variety of the English Renaissance better shown than in the dramatic works of the period which combined to an unusual degree the arts of poetry, music, acting, and dance. This collection of essays by a number of distinguished scholars offers a series of views of the music of this drama -- ranging from the mystery cycles still performed in the late sixteenth century to the cavalier drama of the early seventeenth.

    The essays included here are mainly concerned with the minor dramatic forms -- the mystery plays, the "entertainments," the masques, and the works of such playwrights as Marston and Cartwright -- which reveal more extensively the blending of music and drama; and they illustrate a variety of approaches to the dramatic art. The collection as a whole demonstrates the need for an interdisciplinary consideration of this important area of study. Of especial value to musicologists is the bibliography of extant music used in dramatic works of the period.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6361-1
    Subjects: Language & Literature, Music

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. v-xii)
    John H. Long

    It is the purpose of this volume to present some significant examples of the use of music in English dramatic and semidramatic works composed and presented between the years 1550 and 1650, a span of a century which for this limited purpose shall serve as a temporal definition of the English Renaissance. The bulk of scholarship devoted to the subject in the past has been limited largely to the works of one playwright, Shakespeare, and to one semidramatic form, the court masque. Monumental as Shakespeare was and is, and magnificent as the court masques were, they did not encompass completely...

  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  4. MUSIC IN THE ENGLISH MYSTERY PLAYS
    (pp. 1-31)
    Nan Cooke Carpenter

    MUSIC in the medieval drama is a subject that has been barely touched upon by historians of either literature or music.¹ And yet liturgical drama was actually musical drama; the words were sung throughout, often to the accompaniment of musical instruments.

    Modern drama was, in fact, born of music. Its earliest beginning was as an organic part of the sung Mass—a form of worship that has rightly been called a vast drama in itself, celebrating and symbolizing in words and music the life, suffering, and resurrection of Our Lord. When some anonymous tropist perceptively inserted a few lines of...

  5. THE ENTERTAINMENT AT ELVETHAM, 1591
    (pp. 32-56)
    Ernest Brennecke

    For nearly four days, from Monday afternoon, September 20, to Thursday morning, September 23, 1591, Queen Elizabeth I and her court were the guests of Edward Seymour, Earl of Hertford, at his estate at Elvetham in Hampshire.

    This was an event of the utmost importance in the Earl’s remarkable and for the most part unfortunate career.¹ When he was thirteen years of age his father, former Lord Protector and Duke of Somerset, had been beheaded. Two months after the accession of Elizabeth, Seymour had been created Earl and was eventually granted his father’s confiscated estates, thus becoming one of the...

  6. CAMPION’S ENTERTAINMENT AT BROUGHAM CASTLE, 1617
    (pp. 57-74)
    Ian Spink

    KING James I spent the summer of 1617 in Scotland. Crossing the border on his return to London, he left Carlisle on August 6 and traveled south to Brougham Castle in Westmoreland, where he was to be the guest that night of Francis Clifford, Earl of Cumberland. Nichols says that the royal progress continued on to Appleby Castle the following day, but we shall see that the King must have stayed at least two nights at Brougham.¹

    The following year was publishedThe Ayres that were sung and played) at Brougham Castle in Westmerland) in the Kings Entertainment: Given by...

  7. PATTERNS OF MUSIC AND ACTION IN FLETCHERIAN DRAMA
    (pp. 75-95)
    R. W. Ingram

    JACOBEANS at all levels of society, at work and at play, delighted in music. All the music in Fletcherian drama is there to please, and, although some of it is there for no other reason, it is the intent here to suggest that Fletcher exploited the general delight in and knowledge of music for the benefit of his plays.

    It is important, however, to remember that by “music” is meant songs, dances, and all instrumental music, from conventional flourishes and alarums to concerted masque music. Too often attention has been centered on songs alone and their value as poetry has...

  8. MILTON ON LAWES: THE TRINITY MS REVISIONS
    (pp. 96-102)
    MacDonald Emslie

    MILTON’S well-known sonnet on Henry Lawes exists in five forms. The Trinity College Cambridge MS contains three copies of it; the first is a rough draft in Milton’s hand, the second a fair copy in his hand (both these are on fol. 43), and the third is a fair copy by an amanuensis (on fol. 45). The first printed version of the sonnet appeared inChoice Psalms put into Musick for three voices(1648). Lastly, there is the second printed version, that of the second edition of Milton’s Poems (1673). The earlier versions are particularly interesting with reference to contemporary...

  9. CARTWRIGHT’S DEBT TO LAWES
    (pp. 103-116)
    Willa McClung Evans

    THE debt Cartwright owed to Lawes was perhaps no greater than that Lawes owed to Cartwright. Their collaboration in providing dramatic-musical entertainment extended over a period of years, during which each became obligated to the other for a variety of favors.

    At the beginning of their relationship, sometime before March 26, 1635, Cartwright was an Oxford student whose knowledge of the theater had been picked up largely through observing or participating in performances of university plays.¹ Lawes was a middle-aged, professional musician; he had composed songs for concerts, masques, and dramas.² In view of their respective backgrounds, Cartwright’s debt to...

  10. THE MUSIC FOR THE LYRICS IN EARLY SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH DRAMA: A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE PRIMARY SOURCES
    (pp. 117-160)
    Vincent Duckles

    It is dangerous to claim complete coverage for any bibliographical study, but an attempt to make a comprehensive survey of the musical settings for the Jacobean-Caroline drama must inevitably fall short of its objective. We are still in the process of recovering the work of those musicians who collaborated with Ben Jonson, with Beaumont and Fletcher, with Richard Brome, or with Sir William Davenant. Only within recent years has the music of the early English theater attracted the kind of attention that scholars have long devoted to the texts. The study of Shakespeare music is in a class by itself....

  11. NOTES
    (pp. 161-178)
  12. INDEX
    (pp. 179-184)