Metropolitan City Expenditures

Metropolitan City Expenditures: A Comparative Analysis

Roy W. Bahl
Copyright Date: 1969
Pages: 152
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130jg2c
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  • Book Info
    Metropolitan City Expenditures
    Book Description:

    In this study of the structure of core city expenditures, Mr. Bahl analyzes the functional relationship between per capita expenditures and selected economic, demographic, and sociological factors. He finds that the problems central to intercity variations in per capita spending are directly related to the coordination of fiscal and physical planning and that economic and social areas, not corporate boundaries, represent the most appropriate planning units.

    Mr. Bahl extends the static analysis of the pioneering work of Harvey Brazer to a comparative static and temporal context, comparing through regression techniques the factors underlying per capita variations in 198 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area cities, from 1950 to 1960. His results suggest that the different levels may be primarily attributed to interactions between the central city and the urban fringe and to disparities in the dependence on inter-government revenues.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6186-0
    Subjects: Economics, Finance

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-ix)
  4. CHAPTER ONE: THE SETTING FOR A STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF METROPOLITAN CITY EXPENDITURES
    (pp. 1-16)

    Academic interest in the study of public expenditures, especially in the metropolitan setting, is evident from the number of books, articles, monographs, and dissertations that have recently appeared. One approach to the public spending question that has yielded a large share of published work involves an empirical examination (usually regression analysis) of the functional relationship between per capita expenditures of some levels of government and selected economic, demographic, and sociological variables. The objective is to identify variables that are statistically significant in their association with the level of per capita expenditures-hence the reference to these as “determinants” studies.¹

    At least...

  5. CHAPTER TWO: DEFINING A BEHAVIORAL MODEL OF METROPOLITAN FISCAL ACTIVITY
    (pp. 17-50)

    The fiscal plight of central cities in metropolitan areas is in part traceable to three factors, not mutually exclusive, not collectively exhaustive, but all manifestations of the increasing complexities of the urban form. First are the problems of externalities, or spillovers, that encompass such issues as the urban-suburban exploitation hypotheses, the fragmented nature of local government, and the many corollaries of these two. Second—and not completely independent of the externality problem—is the rapid change during the past two decades in the demographic, economic, and sociopolitical makeup of the core city. Third, the intergovernmental dimensions of metropolitan fiscal relations...

  6. CHAPTER THREE: THE DETERMINANTS OF CORE CITY EXPENDITURES: A CROSS-SECTION MODEL FOR 1960
    (pp. 51-97)

    The preceding chapter focused primarily on a specification of the model and an examination of certain of the interrelationships suggested by the size of the simple correlation coefficients. This chapter is devoted to an interpretation of the cross-section regressions on 1960 data.

    The most easily understood and the most conclusive measure of the joint effects of several independent variables is the coefficient of multiple determination (R²),i.e., that portion of the variation in per capita expenditures that is attributable to fluctuations in the independent variables. A more difficult problem than the measurement of the total variance explained is the measurement...

  7. CHAPTER FOUR: TEMPORAL ASPECTS OF THE NATURE OF METROPOLITAN CITY SPENDING
    (pp. 98-123)

    The empirical analysis of the preceding chapter focuses exclusively on a static examination of the structure of city government expenditures through a cross-sectional regression on 1960 data. While the results of this analysis are partially successful in explaining the intercity differences in the level of municipal expenditures, they contribute little to an understanding of the temporal changes in the pattern of expenditures by the central city government. The brief review of determinants studies presented in chapter two suggests that the cross-section approach has been predominant and that the longitudinal aspects of municipal expenditures generally have been neglected, because of the...

  8. CHAPTER FIVE: THE CONSISTENCIES IN CITY EXPENDITURE RESEARCH: SOME IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY AND THEORY
    (pp. 124-138)

    The completion of this structural analysis of metropolitan city government expenditures requires yet two final considerations. First, the results above must be compared with those of the major earlier work on cities—particularly that of Brazer¹ —to point up more clearly the specific contributions of this study. Second, the effects of data incomparabilities, created by intermetropolitan differences in the division of functional responsibility, on the identification of the significant determinants of city government spending must be estimated. The latter may be approached through a general comparison of the findings in this work with those of empirical studies that have taken...

  9. INDEX
    (pp. 139-140)