The University in the American Future

The University in the American Future

KENNETH D. BENNE
CHARLES MORRIS
HENRY STEELE COMMAGER
GUNNAR MYRDAL
EDITED BY THOMAS B. STROUP
Copyright Date: 1966
Pages: 128
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130jp3s
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  • Book Info
    The University in the American Future
    Book Description:

    In these four notable essays based on Centennial lectures, four eminent scholars analyze the tensions affecting university education today and the forces which will shape the American university of the future.

    Kenneth D. Benne, director of the Human Relations Center of Boston University, describes the fragmentation which has come to characterize the university in 1965 in three divergent philosophies of university education and calls for the universities to undertake a radical change of their social organization. For, he says, only by restoring the community of learning can the universities exercise their proper leadership in resolving the conflicts and tensions of modern society.

    The place of the university as a clearing house of ideas and as the training center for new professions and services is set forth by Sir Charles Morris, vice chancellor of the University of Leeds, and by Henry Steele Commager, professor of American Studies at Amherst College.

    Finally, Gunnar Myrdal of the Institute of International Economic Studies in the University of Stockholm, looking at the probable social and economic trends of the future, sees the expansion of professional, practical, and research training, but warns that the social and moral implications of knowledge cannot be ignored, especially in view of the increasing demands of the developing countries upon the affluent nations.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-6447-2
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. v-xii)
    Thomas B. Stroup

    The Centennial Year at the University of Kentucky has been a time not only for proudly reciting the University’s accomplishments and for asserting its place among American universities, but also—and more importantly—for laying plans for her future. If she is to proceed wisely on her own proper course, she must take account of major trends in higher education and examine her obligations and purposes in the light of national and international requirements. What lies ahead will remain perforce in part obscure, in part unpredictable. But careful observation and clear statement of principles enable wise men in part to...

  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  4. THE IDEA OF A UNIVERSITY IN 1965
    (pp. 1-51)
    KENNETH D. BENNE

    Men and women are impelled to pierce the veil which divides the present from the future by various motivations. So it is with us, I would guess, as we seek to forecast the form and function of the university in A.D. 2000. Such forecasting may be seen as “foretelling” or as “prophecy.”

    If he were moved to “foretell,” the forecaster would purport to describe the established ways and manners of that institution which will carry the name “university” a generation from now. Responsible foretelling rests on several assumptions, all of them dubious to me. One assumption is that we now...

  5. THE UNIVERSITY AND THE MODERN AGE
    (pp. 52-75)
    CHARLES MORRIS

    I remember that when I went to the University of Michigan nearly forty years ago on secondment from Oxford I was greatly taken aback with what seemed to me to be an overwhelming preponderance of professional schools in the university. Round the campus were great buildings housing schools of law, medicine, dentistry, many kinds of engineering, architecture, naval architecture, and so on. The College of Arts and Sciences did not occupy any particularly commanding position, and was in fact quite difficult to find. It was also not very large, though the university as a whole seemed to me to be...

  6. THE UNIVERSITY AND THE COMMUNITY OF LEARNING
    (pp. 76-94)
    HENRY STEELE COMMAGER

    When we consider the nature and the role of the university at the beginning of the next century, the history of predictions admonishes us to be both cautious and modest, for few of them are vindicated by history. “And the things men looked for cometh not / And a path there was, where no man thought” seems to be the rule in history. How sobering to contemplate the utopias of the past, from Plato’sRepublicto Bacon’sNew Atlantis,and Butler’sErewhon;how different the New World from the New Atlantis, how different Australia from Erewhon, how different even the...

  7. THE FUTURE UNIVERSITY
    (pp. 95-112)
    GUNNAR MYRDAL

    The next turn of the century is not very far off. If we make the assumption—uncertain as it is—that the armaments race and the many other brooding causes of international tension and conflict will not explode in a nuclear holocaust, the great majority of student audiences in the United States today will live to celebrate it. From that point of view, it would seem to be entirely reasonable to raise the question of what shape life will take in the United States in A.D. 2000, what the universities will be like, and what role they will play at...

  8. Back Matter
    (pp. 113-113)