The Blue Grass Cook Book

The Blue Grass Cook Book

Compiled by MINNIE C. FOX
With an Introduction by JOHN FOX
New Introduction by TONI TIPTON-MARTIN
Copyright Date: 2012
Edition: 1
Pages: 448
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130jph0
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  • Book Info
    The Blue Grass Cook Book
    Book Description:

    African American cooks were not strangers in the kitchens of the Old South, but white southerners often failed to acknowledge their contributions. One of the first exceptions was Kentucky socialite Minnie C. Fox, who recognized the significant influence and importance of the African American cooks and wroteThe Blue Grass Cook Book, first published in 1904.

    From biscuits and hams to ice creams and puddings, this cookbook is a collection of over three hundred recipes from family and friends, including black cooks, near Minnie Fox's Bourbon County, Kentucky, family estate and her Big Stone Gap, Virginia, home. In Fox's time, the culinary history of black women in the South was usually characterized by demoralizing portraits of servants toiling in "big house" kitchens. In contrast,The Blue Grass Cook Book, with its photographs of African American cooks at work and a passionate introduction by Fox's brother, respected Kentucky novelist John Fox Jr., offers insight into the complex bond between well-to-do mistresses and their cooks at the turn of the century.

    Toni Tipton-Martin's new introduction provides in-depth commentary on the social, cultural, and historical context of this significant cookbook. She presents background information on the Fox family and their apparently uncommon appreciation for the African Americans of their time. She reveals the vital role of the black cooks in the preparation and service required in establishing the well-known Southern hospitality tradition.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-4947-9
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Bluegrass and Black Magic An Introduction to the New Edition
    (pp. v-xxxiv)
    Toni Tipton-Martin

    The written word has been cruel to African American cooks, and that truth alone makes the unearthing and reproduction ofThe Blue Grass Cook Booka cause for celebration. Without even getting to the meat of the matter (or the bread, vegetables, desserts, and drinks), it is satisfying to give credit where it has long been due. This book, written by native Kentuckian Minnie C. Fox and first published in 1904, provides an honest and revealing picture of the state of culinary affairs in the South at the start of the twentieth century, and as such it accomplishes several wonderful...

  3. Introduction
    (pp. xxxv-xlvi)

    It is not wise for a man wh can get sea-sick in a rowboat on a mill-pond to attack a Japanese dinner just after a seventeen days’ voyage across the Pacific. I was just that unwise, and for that reason perhaps can do but scant justice in this Land of the Rising Sun, to a soup in which floats bits of strange fishes from the vasty deep, unknown green things and an island of yellow custard; to slices of many colored raw fish, tough cocks’ combs (real ones) or even to the stewed chicken which at this dinner at least...

  4. List of Contributors
    (pp. xlvii-xlviii)
  5. List of Illustrations
    (pp. xlix-l)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. li-lxxii)
  7. Breads
    (pp. 1-22)
  8. Eggs
    (pp. 23-28)
  9. Soups
    (pp. 29-48)
  10. Fish
    (pp. 49-54)
  11. Oysters
    (pp. 55-62)
  12. Entrees
    (pp. 63-78)
  13. Croquettes
    (pp. 79-84)
  14. Fowl
    (pp. 85-92)
  15. Game
    (pp. 93-96)
  16. Meats
    (pp. 97-116)
  17. Sauces for Entrées, Fish, Fowl and Meats
    (pp. 117-132)
  18. Vegetables
    (pp. 133-150)
  19. Salads
    (pp. 151-160)
  20. Dressings for Salads
    (pp. 161-164)
  21. Ice Cream
    (pp. 165-182)
  22. Ices, Punches, and Sherbets
    (pp. 183-188)
  23. Creams and Other Desserts
    (pp. 189-196)
  24. Jellies
    (pp. 197-200)
  25. Pastry
    (pp. 201-214)
  26. Puddings
    (pp. 215-236)
  27. Sauces for Puddings
    (pp. 237-242)
  28. Cakes
    (pp. 243-272)
  29. Fillings for Cakes
    (pp. 273-280)
  30. Beverages
    (pp. 281-292)
  31. Brandied Peaches
    (pp. 293-294)
  32. Wines
    (pp. 295-296)
  33. Pickles
    (pp. 297-320)
  34. Catsups
    (pp. 321-326)
  35. Preserves
    (pp. 327-334)
  36. Jellies
    (pp. 335-338)
  37. Confections
    (pp. 339-348)
  38. Cheese
    (pp. 349-350)