THE END OF ARROGANCE

THE END OF ARROGANCE

STEVEN WEBER
BRUCE W. JENTLESON
Copyright Date: 2010
Published by: Harvard University Press
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x0gs7
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  • Book Info
    THE END OF ARROGANCE
    Book Description:

    The End of Arrogance makes a strong case for the end of the hegemony of American ideas in the foreign-policy sphere, examines what a more complex and diverse set of influences could create in terms of a future world order, and offers some important advice on how America can keep up in a more competitive world.

    eISBN: 978-0-674-05897-2
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. I-VI)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. VII-VIII)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. IX-XIV)
  4. 1 BIG OPEN QUESTIONS
    (pp. 1-16)

    Five big ideas shaped world politics in the twentieth century:

    Peace was better than war.

    Hegemony, at least the benign sort, was better than balance of power.

    Capitalism was better than socialism.

    Democracy was better than dictatorship.

    Western culture was better than all the rest.

    On all five counts, the United States was widely seen as paragon and guarantor. American power brought peace through a combination of Cold War containment and deterrence, a United Nations based largely on American design, and U.S.-buttressed European unity. It was American hegemony—“benign hegemony” we called it—that brought relative security and progressively more...

  5. 2 A GLOBAL COMPETITION OF IDEAS
    (pp. 17-60)

    In autumn 2003 Donald Rumsfeld asked his top advisors this now famous question: “Are we capturing, killing or deterring and dissuading more terrorists every day than the madrassas and the radical clerics are recruiting, training and deploying against us?” This was, and remains, a reasonable question. What is America’s strategy for getting to a reasonable answer? The way the former secretary of defense phrased the choice offered four options for protecting America’s interests: To capture, kill, deter, or dissuade those who pose threats to the United States. With some shifts in emphasis and formulation, the Obama administration has been pursuing...

  6. 3 FORGING A JUST SOCIETY
    (pp. 61-100)

    Go back for a moment to the big ideas that defined U.S. foreign policy in the second half of the twentieth century—that peace was better than war, hegemony better than balance of power, capitalism better than socialism, democracy better than dictatorship, and Western culture better than anything else. Foreign policy thinkers in the United States today aren’t blind to the fact that questions have been raised about each of these ideas, especially when the ideas are thought about one at a time. In fact, the notion that each big idea taken singly is subject to debate has become almost...

  7. 4 PURSUING A TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY WORLD ORDER
    (pp. 101-147)

    The basis of much of Western contemporary wisdom rests with older societies such as ancient Greece. Sometimes, however, that wisdom falls short in a changing world, and the present political global climate offers such an example. Earth is no more the center of the universe than the United States is the center of the twenty-first-century world order. America still has some gravitational pull, but other nations have slipped out of their orbits or found other orbits. The challenge of world order is how to keep the planets (international players) from crashing into each other or breaking the system apart.

    Like...

  8. 5 BEING STRATEGIC ABOUT THE FUTURE
    (pp. 148-196)

    Imagine you are watching a news broadcast in 2020. The New Eurasia Research Consortium reports on the results of its instant global public opinion poll. This morning they asked 100 million people around the globe a simple question: “What is your opinion of the United States today?” Eighteen percent say they hold a favorable opinion of the United States. Sixteen percent see the United States in a negative light. Sixty-six percent—a full two thirds of those polled—responded “don’t know” or “no opinion.” Surprising? Probably. Inconceivable? We don’t think so. A bad scenario for the world? In many respects,...

  9. NOTES
    (pp. 197-203)
  10. Index
    (pp. 204-210)