Collected Works of Paul Valery, Volume 1: Poems

Collected Works of Paul Valery, Volume 1: Poems

PAUL VALÉRY
Translated by David Paul
Copyright Date: 1971
Pages: 510
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x0s16
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  • Book Info
    Collected Works of Paul Valery, Volume 1: Poems
    Book Description:

    Poems ranging from "La Jeune Parque" and "Le Cimetière marin" to occasional and light verse written as letters to friends, dedications in books, and inscriptions on ladies' fans demonstrate the wide scope of Valéry's lyric preoccupation. The bilingual edition, with David Paul's English translations facing the French texts, includes the autobiographical "Recollection," quoted below, and excerpts on poetry, selected and translated from Valéry's notebooks by James Lawler.

    Paul Valéry turned to the discipline of poetry during the First World War, to escape from the "commotion of a world gone mad." "I fashioned myself a poetry," he wrote, "that had no other law than to establish for me a way of living with myself, for a part of my days."

    Originally published in 1971.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-7309-8
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-xiv)
  3. Recollection
    (pp. xv-xviii)
    Paul Valéry

    It happened at certain stages in my life that poetry became a way of cutting myself off from the “world.”

    By “world” I mean the whole complex of incidents, demands, compulsions, solicitations, of every kind and degree of urgency, which overtake the mind without offering it any inner illuminations, move it only to disturb, and shift it away from the more important toward the less. . . .

    It is no bad thing if certain men have the strength of mind to attach more value and significance to determining a remote decimal number, or to the exact placing of a...

  4. ALBUM DE VERS ANCIENS
  5. LA JEUNE PARQUE
  6. CHARMES
  7. PIÈCES DIVERSES DE TOUTE ÉPOQUE
  8. DOUZE POÈMES
  9. POÈMES PUBLIÉS À PART
  10. VERS DE CIRCONSTANCE
  11. Editor’s Note
    (pp. 389-389)
    J. M.
  12. A Note on the Translations
    (pp. 390-394)
    David Paul
  13. ON POETS AND POETRY: Selected and translated from the Notebooks
    (pp. 397-430)
  14. Notes and Commentaries
    (pp. 433-490)
  15. Back Matter
    (pp. 491-491)