Early Trope Repertory of Saint Martial de Limoges

Early Trope Repertory of Saint Martial de Limoges

Paul Evans
Copyright Date: 1970
Pages: 306
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x109p
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  • Book Info
    Early Trope Repertory of Saint Martial de Limoges
    Book Description:

    Focusing on the earliest and most extensive collection of tropes we now possess, those associated with the abbey of Saint Martial de Limoges in the tenth and early eleventh centuries, Professor Evans offers new conclusions about the nature and early development of the trope.

    Originally published in 1970.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-7213-8
    Subjects: Music

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-xii)
  4. CHAPTER I THE MEANING OF TROPE
    (pp. 1-16)

    One of the central problems in the history of troping is that of terminology. “Qu’est-ce qu’un Trope?” Thus Léon Gautier began his pioneer study of the trope in 1886,¹ and although numerous answers have been advanced, the question still remains a critical one. In fact, the very attempt at definition has helped in large measure to obscure the essential nature of the trope.²

    Too many modern definitions have been partial in their approach. Thus, the literary historian, although not unaware of the musical aspects of the trope, has tended to define the form solely in terms of the function of...

  5. CHAPTER II THE HISTORICAL POSITION OF THE TROPE
    (pp. 17-28)

    The trope as we have described it belongs to a definitely circumscribed period of music history. Contrary to the impression given by a work like Gautier’s, which considers various derived forms as if they were tropes, thereby extending the history of the trope well into the polyphonic period of Gothic music, the trope in its classical form had a relatively short life, from the ninth century to the middle of the eleventh century, although it flourished at a number of centers throughout western Europe during that period.

    Gautier’s division of the history of liturgical interpolation into two periods is, however,...

  6. CHAPTER III THE TROPERS
    (pp. 29-54)

    The tropers of St. Martial de Limoges have been the object of intensive study.¹ Their importance for the history of early medieval music, literature, and art is undeniable, for they provide an almost unrivaled picture of the artistic activity of a single important medieval monastic center from the tenth to the twelfth centuries. They have served as an important source for the study of the Latin planctus and the origins of vernacular poetry, the development of medieval Latin verse and the liturgical drama, the music of the sequentia and the rise of polyphony, the history of Romanesque art and the...

  7. CHAPTER IV THE TEXTS OF THE TROPES
    (pp. 55-72)

    The texts of the tropes have been to a large extent the domain of the literary historians. As valuable as their work has been, it is obvious that their literary interests will condition their approach to the subject, and that this will often lead to a distorted picture of the trope. Thus, for example, the magnificent collection of trope texts presented by Blume and Bannister in Volumes 47 and 49 of theAnalecta Hymnicadoes not give us a true cross section of existing tropes, since it has been expressly limited to poetic texts. Although the editors have interpreted “poetic”...

  8. CHAPTER V THE MUSICAL STRUCTURE OF THE TROPES
    (pp. 73-118)

    In turning to the musical analysis of the tropes, it is important to emphasize that the music of the tropes represents a continuation of the central musical tradition of Gregorian chant composition. The tropes are written in the predominantly neumatic style characteristic of the antiphonal Mass chants that they embellish. Modal formulas are frequently used as the basis of melodic construction. Text declamation follows the principles of the chant itself. Insofar as innovations may be found, they primarily concern the overall formal construction of the pieces. In particular, the length and uniformity of the hexameter trope lines give a conciseness...

  9. Transcriptions
    (pp. 119-274)

    The reasons for selecting Paris 1121 as the basis for transcription have already been discussed at some length, so that here it will perhaps be sufficient to mention briefly the principles of transcription involved and the manner in which the pieces have been presented.

    The notation of Paris 1121 is extremely clear and accurate. Although no dry-point line is used for orientation of the neumes, they are heightened with such accuracy that transcription usually presents no problem once the opening pitch has been determined. Furthermore, custodes are used at the ends of lines—either an “e” for “equaliter,” to indicate...

  10. INDEX OF TROPES IN PARIS 1121
    (pp. 275-284)
  11. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 285-290)
  12. INDEX
    (pp. 291-294)