Psychology of Dementia Praecox

Psychology of Dementia Praecox

C. G. JUNG
TRANSLATED BY R. F. C. HULL
Copyright Date: 1960
Pages: 248
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x17c3
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  • Book Info
    Psychology of Dementia Praecox
    Book Description:

    Jung began his career as a psychiatrist in 1900, when he was 25, as an assistant working under Dr. Eugen Bleuler at the Burgholzli Hospital in Zurich. In 1906, after he had become senior staff physician and before his first meeting with Freud in Vienna in 1907, Jung wrote his famous monograph "On the Psychology of Dementia Praecox." Ernest Jones described it as "a book that made history in psychiatry and extended many of Freud's ideas into the realm of the psychoses proper." A. A. Brill (whose introduction to his 1936 translation is included here) has called this work indispensable for every student of psychiatry-"the work which firmly established Jung as a pioneer and scientific contributor to psychiatry."

    Originally published in 1974.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-7243-5
    Subjects: Psychology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. EDITORIAL NOTE
    (pp. v-viii)
    M.F., G.A. and W.M.
  3. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. ix-xii)
    A. A. Brill

    When I came to Burghölzli (Clinic of Psychiatry in Zurich) in 1907, I was no longer a tyro in psychiatry. It was my good fortune to have been among the first group of students at the New York Psychiatric Institute, where Dr. Adolf Meyer gave us a thorough grounding in clinical psychiatry and neuropathology. That was in 1903, which was the beginning of the new era of modern psychiatry not only here, but in the whole psychiatric world, wherein the name of Kraepelin shone resplendently. Dr. Meyer initiated us into this modern psychiatry by giving us lectures, clinics, and abstracts...

  4. I The Psychology of Dementia Praecox
    • Table of Contents
      (pp. xiii-xiv)
    • FOREWORD
      (pp. 3-4)
      C. G. Jung

      This work is the fruit of three years’ experimental researches and clinical observations. In view of the complexity and magnitude of the material, my work cannot and does not lay claim either to finality of treatment or to absolute certainty of the statements and conclusions. On the contrary, it combines all the disadvantages of eclecticism, which to many a reader may seem so striking that he will call my work a confession of faith rather than a scientific treatise.Peu importe!The important thing is that I should be able to show the reader how, through psychological investigation, I have...

    • 1. CRITICAL SURVEY OF THEORETICAL VIEWS ON THE PSYCHOLOGY OF DEMENTIA PRAECOX
      (pp. 5-37)

      The literature which treats of the psychological disturbances in dementia praecox is very fragmentary, and although parts of it are quite extensive it nowhere shows any clear co-ordination. The statements of the older authors have only a limited value, because they refer now to this, now to that form of illness, which can be classified only very indefinitely as dementia praecox. Hence one cannot attribute any general validity to them. The first and somewhat more general view concerning the nature of the psychological disturbance in catatonia, so far as I know, was that of Tschisch (1886),¹ who thought that the...

    • 2. THE FEELING-TONED COMPLEX AND ITS GENERAL EFFECTS ON THE PSYCHE
      (pp. 38-51)

      My theoretical premises for an understanding of the psychology of dementia praecox are, in principle, exhausted with the contents of the first chapter, for Freud has, strictly speaking, said all that is essential in his works on hysteria, obsessional neurosis, and dreams. Nevertheless our concepts, worked out on an experimental basis, differ somewhat from those of Freud, and it may be that the concept of the feeling-toned complex goes a little beyond the scope of Freud’s views.

      The essential basis of our personality is affectivity.¹ Thought and action are, as it were, only symptoms of affectivity.² The elements of psychic...

    • 3. THE INFLUENCE OF THE FEELING-TONED COMPLEX ON THE VALENCY OF ASSOCIATIONS
      (pp. 52-69)

      How the complex comes to light in the association experiment has been explained a number of times already, and we must refer the reader to our earlier publications. Here we shall come back to one point only which is of theoretical value. We frequently meet with reactions that are built up in the following manner:

      The first reaction in each of the three examples contains the complex (in 1 and 3 it refers to an erotic relationship, and in 2 to an injury). The second reactions show the perseverating feeling-tone of the preceding reaction, as can be seen from the...

    • 4· DEMENTIA PRAECOX AND HYSTERIA
      (pp. 70-98)

      An exhaustive comparison of dementia praecox and hysteria would be possible only if we had a more thorough knowledge of the disturbances of association in both diseases, and particu larly of the affective disturbances in normal persons. This at present is far from being the case. What I intend to do here is simply to review the psychological similarities on the basis of the preceding discussion. As the later account of the association experiment in dementia praecox will show, a preliminary comparison of dementia praecox and hysteria is necessary in order to understand the phenomena of catatonic association.

      The recent...

    • 5· ANALYSIS OF A CASE OF PARANOID DEMENTIA AS A PARADIGM
      (pp. 99-152)

      B. St., dressmaker, unmarried, born 1845. The patient was admitted in 1887 and since then has remained permanently in the asylum. She has a severe hereditary taint. Before admission she had, for several years, heard voices that slandered her. For a time she contemplated suicide by drowning. She explained the voices as invisible telephones. They called out to her that she was a woman of doubtful character, that her child had been found in a toilet, that she had stolen a pair of scissors in order to poke out a child’s eyes. (According to the anamnesis the pa tient had...

  5. II
    • ON THE PSYCHOGENESIS OF SCHIZOPHRENIA
      (pp. 155-171)

      It is just twenty years since I read a paper on “The Problem of Psychogenesis in Mental Disease”² before this Society. William McDougall, whose recent death we all deplore, was in the chair. What I said then about psychogenesis could safely be repeated today, for it has left no visible traces, or other noticeable consequences, either in text-books or in clinics. Although I hate to repeat myself, it is almost impossible to say anything wholly new and different about a subject which has not changed its face in the many years that have gone by. My experience has increased and...

    • RECENT THOUGHTS ON SCHIZOPHRENIA
      (pp. 172-177)

      Without doubt we are on the eve of a new age which will ask us some difficult questions. Your request for a forecast con cerning future developments in psychology, psychopathology, and psychotherapy sets me, as you probably realize, no easy task. It is a well-known fact in the history of science that very often just the most important and epoch-making developments emerge from rather unexpected discoveries or from hitherto neglected or underestimated spheres of thought. Under such conditions, prognostication becomes so doubtful an undertaking that I prefer to refrain from incompetent attempts at prophecy, and to present my opinion as...

    • SCHIZOPHRENIA
      (pp. 178-193)

      It is the privilege of old age to look back upon the paths one has travelled. I must thank Professor Manfred Bleuler for giving me the opportunity of presenting my experiences in the domain of schizophrenia before a meeting of my professional colleagues.

      It was in the year 1901 that I, a young assistant physician at Burgholzli, asked my then chief, Professor Eugen Bleuler, to propose a theme for my doctoral dissertation. He suggested that I investigate experimentally the disintegration of ideas in schizophrenia. At that time we had already penetrated so far into the psychology of these patients with...

  6. APPENDIX: Letter to the Second International Congress of Psychiatry (Symposium on Chemical Concepts of Psychosis), 1957
    (pp. 194-194)
  7. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 197-208)
  8. INDEX
    (pp. 209-222)
  9. Back Matter
    (pp. 223-234)