Report of the Committee on the Future of the College

Report of the Committee on the Future of the College

MARVIN BRESSLER
Copyright Date: 1973
Pages: 436
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x1cc1
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  • Book Info
    Report of the Committee on the Future of the College
    Book Description:

    Contents: Letter of Transmittal to the President ii; Members and Staff of the Commission on the Future of the College iv; Special Studies v; Acknowledgments vi; 1. The Commission on the Future of the College: Background and Purposes 3; 2. The Student on Campus: Composition, Undergraduate Life, Provisions for Advising and Counselling 23; 3. The Size of the College, Coeducation and the Composition of the Student Body 73; 4. The Structure of Academic Time 129; 5. Curriculum and Pedagogy 161; 6. Evaluation of Performance: Students and Faculty 215; Appendices; 1. Projected Enrollment 249; 2. Analysis of Costs and Income of 400 Additional Students 255; 3. Survey Instruments 275; References and Notes 289; Tables 299

    Originally published in 1973.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-6747-9
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-i)
  2. Letter of Transmittal to the President
    (pp. ii-iii)
  3. Members and Staff of the Commission on the Future of the College
    (pp. iv-iv)
  4. SPECIAL STUDIES
    (pp. v-v)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. vi-vi)
  6. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  7. CHAPTER 1 The Commission on the Future of the College: Background and Purposes
    (pp. 3-20)

    In the late winter of 1970, former President Robert F. Goheen established a Commission on the Future of the College with the general mandate to conduct “a major review of undergraduate education at Princeton” and to develop recommendations about an imposing bill of particulars which suggests the range of the Commission’s tasks. In the language of the President’s charge:

    These include, but are not limited to, the following: the relation of undergraduate experience to secondary school education and to post-college careers; the extent to which formal academic instruction should be connected to learning opportunities in the larger society; the appropriate...

  8. CHAPTER 2 The Student on Campus: Composition, Undergraduate Life, Provisions for Advising and Counselling
    (pp. 23-70)

    Princeton’s undergraduate program is based on (1) academic and extracurricular excellence, (2) demographic, cultural, and personal diversity, and (3) a learning environment in which each of these can thrive. These commitments are reflected in admissions policies and procedures which are designed to enroll students with a high potential for effective participation in the intellectual and extra-curricular life of the College. The composition of the student body is, of course, one of the critical variables in the College experience since able students can best profit from instruction by a distinguished faculty. This is all the more true since the Princeton setting...

  9. CHAPTER 3 The Size of the College, Coeducation and the Composition of the Student Body
    (pp. 73-126)

    How large should the Undergraduate College be? What kinds of students should compose it and how should they be chosen? These are the questions that constitute the subject of this section of our Report. They are among the most central and crucial issues that we face; for

    1. almost nothing has a greater impact on the education of students than the intellectual and human environment within which they receive their education, and a central determinant of that environment is precisely how many and what kinds of other students are there to shape it. We are made further aware of the importance...

  10. CHAPTER 4 The Structure of Academic Time
    (pp. 129-158)

    The duration, pace, and continuity of study and the organization of the school year are the fundamental units of academic time. These elements once appeared to be among the least problematic in the educational system. Until recently there were few beliefs that were more honored by custom and regarded as more natural than the conviction that a college education should begin after twelve years of prior schooling and should be completed during eight consecutive semesters of campus-based study. This pattern is still preferred by most but it has been increasingly questioned by a growing number of educators and students who...

  11. CHAPTER 5 Curriculum and Pedagogy
    (pp. 161-212)

    The obligation to adopt a curriculum compels the end of agnosticism with respect to the meaning of the term “education.” A curriculum is educational philosophy incorporated in a structure and the formal program of studies thus reveals some of the institution’s most fundamental convictions. The institution cannot avoid, for example, taking a stand on prescription versus election, an issue that has agitated the American college since colonial times. Henry Dunster, Harvard’s first president, followed the course of study of his alma mater, Cambridge University, in establishing the first collegiate curriculum in America. It incorporated the medieval seven liberal arts (arithmetic,...

  12. CHAPTER 6 Evaluation of Performance: Students and Faculty
    (pp. 215-248)

    Academic evaluation serves a variety of major and subsidiary purposes including the inducement of quality, certification, diagnosis and counselling, motivation, and control. Certification refers to credentials which assure the wider community that students, faculty, or universities have met socially valued standards of academic proficiency. Diagnosis, by contrast, is mainly intended for internal use, is essentially an extension of the instructional process, and includes all those procedures which are designed to inform individuals and the institution how well they are achieving their educational goals. Since the formal power to judge and admonish may also be the power to grant or deny...

  13. APPENDIX 1 Projected Enrollment
    (pp. 249-254)
  14. APPENDIX 2 Analysis of Costs and Income of 400 Additional Students
    (pp. 255-274)
  15. APPENDIX 3 Survey Instruments
    (pp. 275-288)
  16. REFERENCES AND NOTES
    (pp. 289-297)
  17. TABLES
    (pp. 298-427)