Psychoanalytic Years: (From Vols. 2, 4, 17 Collected Works)

Psychoanalytic Years: (From Vols. 2, 4, 17 Collected Works)

C. G. JUNG
R. F. C. HULL
LEOPOLD STEIN
IN COLLABORATION WITH DIANA RIVIERE
Series: Jung Extracts
Copyright Date: 1974
Pages: 188
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x1cq6
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  • Book Info
    Psychoanalytic Years: (From Vols. 2, 4, 17 Collected Works)
    Book Description:

    Between the years 1906 and 1912, Jung practiced as a psychoanalyst, and his association with Freud was very close. Though their personal relationship became strained after the publication of Jung's book,Wandlungen und Symbole der Libido(1911-12), Jung continued to serve as president of the International Psychoanalytic Association until 1914. The present volume covers the period of Jung's close and enthusiastic collaboration with Freud and includes one of Jung's famous studies in word association which demonstrates Freud's influence even before they were working together.

    Originally published in 1975.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-6859-9
    Subjects: Psychology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. EDITORIAL NOTE
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-2)
  4. 1. PSYCHOANALYSIS AND ASSOCIATION EXPERIMENTS
    (pp. 3-32)

    It is not easy to say in a few words what is the essence of Freud’s theory of hysteria and of the psychoanalytic method. Freud’s terminology and conceptions are still in the making—luckily, if I may say so, because, in spite of the amazing progress that, thanks to Freud’s contributions, insight into hysteria has made in recent years, neither Freud nor we, his followers, have gained full knowledge of it. It is therefore not surprising that Freud in his most recent publication on hysteria² has for the most part abandoned the terminology that he had laid down in the...

  5. 2. FREUD’S THEORY OF HYSTERIA: A REPLY TO ASCHAFFENBURG
    (pp. 33-39)

    If I try to answer Aschaffenburg’s—on the whole—very moderate and cautious criticism of Freud’s theory of hysteria,² I do so in order to prevent the baby from being thrown out with the bath-water. Aschaffenburg, of course, does not assert that Freud’s importance ends with his theory of hysteria. But the medical public (psychiatrists included) know Freud mainly from this side of his work, and for this reason adverse criticism could easily throw a shadow on Freud’s other scientific achievements. I would like to remark at the start that my reply is not directed to Aschaffenburg personally, but to...

  6. 3. THE FREUDIAN THEORY OF HYSTERIA
    (pp. 40-54)

    It is always a difficult and ungrateful task to discuss a theory which the author himself has not formulated in any final way. Freud has never propounded a cut-and-dried theory of hysteria; he has simply tried, from time to time, to formulate his theoretical conclusions in accordance with his experience at that moment. His theoretical formulations can claim the status of a working hypothesis that agrees with experience at all points. For the present, therefore, there can be no talk of a firmly-established Freudian theory of hysteria, but only of numerous experiences which have certain features in common. As we...

  7. 4. A CONTRIBUTION TO THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RUMOUR
    (pp. 55-67)

    About a year ago the school authorities in N. asked me to furnish a report on the mental condition of Marie X., a thirteen-year-old school-girl. Marie had recently been expelled from the school because she was instrumental in originating an ugly rumour, spreading gossip about her class-teacher. The punishment hit the child, and especially her parents, very hard, so that the school authorities were inclined to readmit her under the cover of a medical opinion.

    The facts of the case were as follows. The teacher had heard indirectly that the girls were telling an ambiguous sexual story about him. On...

  8. 5. MORTON PRINCE, “THE MECHANISM AND INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS”: A CRITICAL REVIEW
    (pp. 68-85)

    I hope that all colleagues and fellow workers who, following in Freud’s footsteps, have investigated the problem of dreams, and have been able to confirm the basic principles of dream-interpretation, will forgive me if I pass over their corroborative work and speak instead of another investigation which, though it has led to less positive results, is for that reason the more suited to public discussion. A fact especially worth noting is that Morton Prince, thanks to his previous work and his deep insight into psychopathological problems, is singularly well equipped to understand the psychology inaugurated by Freud. I do not...

  9. 6. ON THE CRITICISM OF PSYCHOANALYSIS
    (pp. 86-89)

    It is a well-known fact to the psychoanalyst that laymen, even those with relatively little education, are able to understand the nature and rationale of psychoanalysis without undue intellectual difficulty. It is the same with educated people, be they scholars, business-men, journalists, artists, or teachers. They can all understand the truths of psychoanalysis. They also understand very well why psychoanalysis cannot be expounded in the same convincing way as a mathematical proposition. Everyone of common sense knows that a psychological proof must necessarily be different from a physical one, and that each branch of science can only offer proofs that...

  10. 7. CONCERNING PSYCHOANALYSIS
    (pp. 90-93)
  11. 8. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FATHER IN THE DESTINY OF THE INDIVIDUAL
    (pp. 94-116)

    This little essay, written seventeen years ago, ended with the words: “It is to be hoped that experience in the years to come will sink deeper shafts into this obscure territory, on which I have been able to shed but a fleeting light, and will discover more about the secret workshop of the daemon who shapes our fate.” Experience in later years has indeed altered and deepened many things; some of them have appeared in a different light, and I have seen how the roots of the psyche and of fate go deeper than the “family romance,” and that not...

  12. 9. PSYCHIC CONFLICTS IN A CHILD
    (pp. 117-152)

    I am publishing this little study just as it is, without making any alterations for the second edition. Although in point of fact our conceptions have been considerably modified and extended since these observations first appeared in 1910, I do not feel that the subsequent modifications would justify me in describing the views put forward in the first edition as basically false, an imputation that has been laid against me in certain quarters. On the contrary, just as the observations here recorded have retained their value as facts, so also have the conceptions themselves. But no conception is ever all-embracing,...

  13. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 153-158)
  14. INDEX
    (pp. 159-168)
  15. Back Matter
    (pp. 169-180)