Civil War Recipes

Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book

LILY MAY SPAULDING
JOHN SPAULDING
Copyright Date: 1999
Pages: 272
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x1sct
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  • Book Info
    Civil War Recipes
    Book Description:

    Godey's Lady's Book, perhaps the most popular magazine for women in nineteenth-century America, had a national circulation of 150,000 during the 1860s. The recipes (spelled ""receipts"") it published were often submitted by women from both the North and the South, and they reveal the wide variety of regional cooking that characterized American culture. There is a remarkable diversity in the recipes, thanks to the largely rural readership of Godey's Lady's Book and to the immigrant influence on the country in the 1860s. Fish and game were readily available in rural America, and the number of seafood recipes testifies to the abundance of the coastal waters and rivers. The country cook was a frugal cook, particularly during wartime, so there are a great many recipes for leftovers and seasonal produce. In addition to a wide sampling of recipes that can be used today, Civil War Recipes includes information on Union and Confederate army rations, cooking on both homefronts, and substitutions used during the war by southern cooks.

    eISBN: 978-0-8131-4659-1
    Subjects: History, American Studies

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. I-VI)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. VII-VIII)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. IX-IX)
    Lily May Spaulding
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-40)
    John Spaulding

    The recipes included here were selected fromGodey’s Lady’s Bookin the period of the Civil War, the 1860s, when the magazine was at its zenith.Godey’s Lady’s Book,perhaps the most popular magazine for women in the nineteenth century, existed in various forms for sixty-eight years, from 1830 to 1898. Unlike most American periodicals of the time,Godey’shad a national rather than regional readership and reached its highest circulation of some 150,000 copies during the 1860s. Now famous for its hand-colored fashion plates,Godey’salso included sections on domestic architecture, sewing patterns, fiction, science, editorials, poetry, and activities...

  5. BILLS OF FARE
    (pp. 41-46)

    The following bills of fare were selected from the many given in Godey’s “as a guide to housekeepers in selecting dishes for the table”.

    Potatoes were always served, regardless of the season. Chicken was usually served in the summer, perhaps because on a small farm that was the most appropriate time for “culling” the flock. Dessert was typically a pudding, hence the large number of puddings included in this volume.

    Those recipes preceded by a bullet () can be found in this volume.

    Fish with Piquante Sauce

    Potatoes Fried Jerusalem Artichokes

    Remove. —Sirloin of Beef [Beef Steak] or Fillet of...

  6. BEVERAGES
    (pp. 47-58)
  7. SOUPS
    (pp. 59-70)
  8. CEREALS, BREADS, and YEAST
    (pp. 71-88)
  9. EGGS AND CHEESE
    (pp. 89-98)
  10. VEGETABLES
    (pp. 99-118)
  11. SALAD DRESSINGS and SAUCES
    (pp. 119-122)
  12. FISH and SHELLFISH
    (pp. 123-136)
  13. POULTRY and WILDFOWL
    (pp. 137-150)
  14. MEATS
    (pp. 151-180)
  15. PASTRIES and PIES
    (pp. 181-194)
  16. CAKES and ICINGS
    (pp. 195-210)
  17. BISCUITS [COOKIES] and CONFECTIONS
    (pp. 211-218)
  18. DESSERTS
    (pp. 219-234)
  19. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 235-242)
  20. REFERENCES
    (pp. 243-246)
  21. INDEX
    (pp. 247-264)