Neo-Latin Philology: Old Tradition, New Approaches

Neo-Latin Philology: Old Tradition, New Approaches

Edited by Marc VAN DER POEL
Volume: 35
Copyright Date: 2014
Published by: Leuven University Press
Pages: 208
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt14jxt24
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  • Book Info
    Neo-Latin Philology: Old Tradition, New Approaches
    Book Description:

    Material Philology and the study of Renaissance Latin literature. Neo-Latin Philology: Old Tradition, New Approaches explores the question whether the approaches developed in the so-called New or Material Philology can be applied to the study of Renaissance Latin literature. Two contributions in this volume focus on theoretical issues, the first presenting a critical assessment of the debate on New Philology in the 1990s, the second providing some guidelines for researchers of the materiality of sources. The remaining seven contributions discuss various ways in which the material presentation in either manuscript or print played a part in the interpretation of a variety of texts, including Basinio of Parma’s Hesperis, Niccolò Perotti's Cornu copiae, some poems by Janus Secundus, a commentary on Horace’s Ars poetica, Otto Venius’ Emblemata Horatiana, Johann Lauremberg's play Pompejus Magnus, and the Alithinologia by John Lynch.

    eISBN: 978-94-6166-134-0
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 7-12)
    Marc van der Poel

    On 26 and 27 October 2010 a small group of philologists in the field of Medieval and Renaissance Latin and Italian literature convened in Nijmegen for the conference ‘Neo-Latin Philology, Old Tradition, New Approaches’, to discuss the question whether the approaches developed in the so-called New or Material Philology can sensibly be applied to the study of Latin literature in the Renaissance. This question was raised by the two organizers of the conference, Werner Gelderblom and Marc van der Poel, in the context of our interest in the materiality of literature, a topic which Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts had...

  4. WHAT’S IN A NAME: OLD, NEW, AND MATERIAL PHILOLOGY, TEXTUAL SCHOLARSHIP, AND IDEOLOGY
    (pp. 13-24)
    Haijo J. Westra

    Bernard Cerquiglini’sÉloge de la variante, published in 1989, ‘hit North Americian medievalists like abrise marine’, according to one reviewer who characterised Cerquiglini’s work retrospectively as follows:

    SubtitledHistoire critique de la philologie, this brief polemical essay became the centerpiece of the New Philology: a vision of the practice of medieval studies, centering in particular on Old French literature[s], that sought to historicize the discipline, to locate it politically and socially… and to reclaim it from the positivist regressives for the theoretically savvy progressives. (Lerer (2000), 369)¹

    The gauntlet thrown down so provocatively by Cerquiglini was taken up very...

  5. METHOD, HISTORY, AND THEORY IN MATERIAL PHILOLOGY
    (pp. 25-48)
    H. Wayne Storey

    Few are the disciplines that would be more ‘resistant to theory’ than material philology. Founded upon an evolving methodology of best practices, standards of observation and representation, and new paradigms of interpretation, it is a discipline that describes and assesses “the material” in its complex contexts of production, reproduction, and use. Its pragmatic advances have been quietly noteworthy. For example, together with colleagues in the archival and library sciences, it has brought about a far more rigorous and useful set of tools in manuscript description, including the simple measurement of a manuscript’s ruled writing space that links production far more...

  6. IN SEARCH OF THE MARGINAL AUTHOR. THE WORKING COPY OF BASINIO OF PARMA’S HESPERIS
    (pp. 49-70)
    Christoph Pieper

    Recently, Basinio of Parma (or Basinio Basini, as one finds alternatively) has received considerable research interest.¹ Obviously, he is considered an interesting example of the phenomenon ofpoeti cortigianiwho wrote their poetry in direct contact with and sometimes even on the instruction of the ruler whom they served.² Basinio actually had two such literary patrons: after some years at the court of Lionello d’Este in Ferrara, he came to Rimini – in 1449 or early 1450 – on the invitation of Sigismondo Malatesta. The ruler of Rimini was famous for his interest in architecture and literature, and he stimulated...

  7. THE MATERIAL FORTUNE OF NICCOLÒ PEROTTI’S CORNU COPIAE IN THE FIFTEENTH AND EARLY SIXTEENTH CENTURIES
    (pp. 71-88)
    Marianne Pade

    The present chapter is part of a collection of articles that focuses on the materiality of Latin texts in the Early Modern Age. Contributors have been asked to discuss the different ways in which the material presentation in manuscript or print may have influenced readers’ approach to a text at various periods. This chapter does not in any way ignore that aspect, but I have also ventured to turn the question the other way around, to ask how the interpretation of a text may influence various aspects of its material presentation. Describing the material fortune of Niccolò Perotti’sCornu copiae...

  8. THE TORTUOUS PATH FROM ANONYMITY TO AUTHORSHIP: MS BAV VAT. LAT. 2742
    (pp. 89-106)
    David Rijser

    The MS BAVVaticanus Latinus2742 contains a commentary on Horace’sArs Poeticawith an introductory essay on the history and function of poetry in general, dating from the first decades of the sixteenth century. This text has played a significant role in the scholarly interpretation of the nature and function of poetics in the Vatican during the pontificate of Julius II and Leo X, figuring, for instance, prominently in the pages of Ingrid Rowland’sThe Culture of the High Renaissanceof 1998 and Christiane Joost-Gaugier’s study of theStanza della Segnaturain the Vatican apartments of 2002, although it...

  9. THE MATERIALITY OF REVISION: MANUSCRIPT, PRINT AND REVISIONS IN JOHANNES SECUNDUS’ POETRY
    (pp. 107-130)
    Werner J.C.M. Gelderblom

    The development of the internet, which now influences the life of nearly every human being, has made us fully aware of the impact of a new publication medium on our ways of writing and reading, and also of the slow and gradual pace of this impact: more than forty years after the first introduction of a long-distance computer network we are still discovering the full possibilities of the world wide web. Similarly, fifteenth-century Europe experienced a world-changing moment, when Johannes Gutenberg introduced the technique of movable type printing in Europe, and so paved the way for the printed book, which...

  10. VENIUS’ EMBLEMATA HORATIANA: MATERIAL FRAGMENTATION OF A CLASSICAL POET
    (pp. 131-164)
    Marc van der Poel

    The goal of this contribution is to discuss how classical texts were taken out of their original context, split up in fragments and used in new, contemporary contexts during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This process of fragmentation and adaptation is illustrated through a cursory discussion of theEmblemata Horatianaby Otto van Veen, a well-known work which was frequently reprinted in various re-editions, translations and adaptations between 1607 and 1755. More specifically, we will take a look at three editions: the first edition by van Veen himself (Antwerp 1607), the edition by Marin le Roy de Gomberville (Paris 1646)...

  11. ANTIQUARIAN LATIN AND THE MATERIALITY OF LATE HUMANIST CULTURE: THE CASE OF JOHANN LAUREMBERG’S PLAY POMPEJUS MAGNUS (1610)
    (pp. 165-182)
    Tom Deneire

    The stylistic ‘school’ of antiquarianism probably belongs to one of the more obscurecapitain Neo-Latin literary history. In one of the few passages in secondary literature that discuss it at all, Jozef IJsewijn mentioned ‘a play on Pompey entirely in archaic Latin’, for which the author ‘excused himself for making his hero speak a language which was two centuries or more older’.¹ The work IJsewijn drew attention to, published in 1610 asPompejus Magnusby one Johann Lauremberg, will be the object of the present contribution.

    When the excellent library staff of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven was finally able...

  12. READING AND WRITING IN THE EARLY MODERN PERIOD: NEW PHILOLOGY AND THE ALITHINOLOGIA (1664)
    (pp. 183-198)
    Nienke Tjoelker

    ‘New Philology’ was first and foremost a methodology for manuscript study. For the New Philologists, the recovery of an ‘original’ reading wrongly privileged a modern notion of authorial authenticity which was not applicable to medieval texts, and, in their view, every reading had its own value.² New Philology also helped open up the field of medieval manuscript study for material philology, which is characterised by a number of general tendencies. Material philology made the social contexts in which the surviving forms of a text were produced its focus, rather than merely attempting to reconstruct any form that preceded them. A...

  13. INDEX NOMINUM
    (pp. 199-202)
  14. NOTES ON THE CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 203-206)
  15. Back Matter
    (pp. 207-208)