Andreae Alciati Contra Vitam Monasticam Epistula - Andrea Alciato’s Letter Against Monastic Life

Andreae Alciati Contra Vitam Monasticam Epistula - Andrea Alciato’s Letter Against Monastic Life: Critical Edition, Translation and Commentary

Critical Edition Denis L. DRYSDALL
Volume: 36
Copyright Date: 2014
Published by: Leuven University Press
Pages: 144
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt14jxt5p
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    Andreae Alciati Contra Vitam Monasticam Epistula - Andrea Alciato’s Letter Against Monastic Life
    Book Description:

    Criticism of monastic life by one of Europe’s major Renaissance figures. In his letter Against Monastic Life (1514–17) Andrea Alciato, an Italian jurist and writer famous for his Emblemata, urges his friend Bernardus Mattius to reconsider his choice of monastic life. Alciato makes his argument by criticizing religious superstition, the Church’s hierarchy, and monastic practices, particularly the Franciscans’ hypocrisy, wealth, and divisiveness. Instead, he defends a stoic, civic humanism. Due to the troubled history of this unique manuscript and the inadequacies of the two subsequent editions, Alciato’s discourse has been obscured for centuries. This edition and translation seeks to make clear the biographical importance of the text for one of the major figures of the European Renaissance.

    eISBN: 978-94-6166-133-3
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 7-7)
  4. [Illustrations]
    (pp. 8-8)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 9-20)

    Alciato’s letter to his friend Bernardus Mattius is better known for the author’s worries about its circulation than for its content.¹ It also raises questions about its date and about the identity of the addressee. As Karl Enenkel has shown, while the only surviving manuscript is a posthumous copy bearing the date 7 June 1553, the letter itself was composed very probably in the second half of 1517 or early 1518.² The only suggestion one might add to this is that remarks in the letter about the proliferation of sects seem to imply that the partial solution arrived at after...

  6. Appendices
    (pp. 21-24)
  7. NOTE ON THE TEXT AND TRANSLATION
    (pp. 25-27)
  8. [Illustrations]
    (pp. 28-28)
  9. TEXT AND TRANSLATION
    (pp. 29-136)

    Considering in what follows things not disapproved by the catholic church.

    [1] When Valterus Corbetes,¹ a very good friend of both of us, told me in a letter that you have changed your manner of life and entered the Minorite family, that you were wearing a dun-coloured habit, with a cord around your waist, and clogs on your feet, and were chanting the hours with your colleagues, I thought I was reading the impious books of the Samosatan. He stuffed so many fables into them, so many trivia, even though he proclaimed by his title to give the truth about...

  10. INDEX OF NAMES
    (pp. 137-142)
  11. SUPPLEMENTA HUMANISTICA LOVANIENSIA
    (pp. 143-144)