Medieval

Medieval

Andrew Carpenter General Editor
Rachel Moss Editor
Volume: I
Copyright Date: 2015
Edition: 1
Published by: Royal Irish Academy
Pages: 571
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt14jxtv1
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  • Book Info
    Medieval
    Book Description:

    Art and Architecture of Ireland is an authoritative and fully illustrated survey encompassing the period from the early Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. This complete five volume set explores all aspects of Irish art – from high crosses to installation art, from illuminated manuscripts to Georgian houses and Modernist churches, from tapestries and sculptures to oil paintings, photographs and video art. This monumental project provides new insights into every facet of the strength, depth and variety of Ireland’s artistic and architectural heritage.

    eISBN: 978-1-908996-62-6
    Subjects: Art & Art History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-v)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. vi-vi)
    James Slevin

    As theArt and Architecture of Ireland(AAI) reaches publication, the Royal Irish Academy wishes to acknowledge those who brought the idea of this major project to the Academy and to express its gratitude and appreciation to the funders who made such an ambitious undertaking possible.

    In the spring of 2007, two art historians from University College Dublin, Nicola Figgis and Paula Murphy, asked the Academy to consider supporting a project to update Walter Strickland’s celebratedA Dictionary of Irish Artists(1913). I, as president, turned to one of the Academy’s members, Carmel Naughton, for advice and direction. We organized...

  3. GENERAL EDITORʹS PREFACE
    (pp. vii-x)
    Andrew Carpenter
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. xi-xiii)
  5. CONVENTIONS
    (pp. xiv-xiv)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. xv-xv)
    Rachel Moss
  7. LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. xvi-xvii)
  8. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xviii-xx)
  9. CHRONOLOGY
    (pp. xxi-xxiii)
  10. [Illustration]
    (pp. xxiv-xxiv)
  11. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-8)

    When his friend Arthur Power sought advice on writing, James Joyce suggested that he could do worse than examine theBook of Kells. ‘Wherever I have been, in whatever pass of life or circumstance, I have always carried that with me and gone to it for inspiration. You can compare much of my work to the intricate designs of its illuminations, and I have pored over its workmanship for hours at a time in Dublin, in Trieste, in Rome, in Geneva – wherever I have been, and I have always got inspiration from it’. (A. Power,From the Old Waterford...

  12. 1 INFLUENCES AND IMPACTS
    (pp. 9-38)

    A work of art or building is created in a moment of time. It mirrors the values, tastes and cultural references of its creators at that point in history, and the manner in which these have been manipulated to convey a particular impression or meaning. Ways of seeing and interpreting visual culture are constantly evolving, so that even if physically unchanged, the same artwork is likely to be appreciated in a very different way by successive generations, and also by viewers from different social or cultural backgrounds.

    This section explores some of the issues that have impacted on the values...

  13. 2 MOVEMENTS, MOTIFS AND MEANINGS
    (pp. 39-81)

    The definition of artistic styles and periods is the work of the art historian, not the artist, and so too is the analysis of particular motifs. Nonetheless, the artificial division of the development of Irish medieval art into stylistic ‘chapters’, often defined by particular motifs, has created a paradigm against which to view its place in the wider artistic world. While some motifs were purely decorative, others were imbued with layers of meaning. Messages of particular significance were sometimes conveyed through the labelling of art works, but in many cases there was the assumption that the viewer had a visual...

  14. 3 MATERIALS AND METHODS
    (pp. 83-120)

    Irish medieval art and architecture is broadly defined in this volume. Investment in the creation and embellishment of buildings and objects extended beyond the fairly narrow definitions developed during the early modern period, to encompass a range of media. Now best represented by stone ruins, medieval architecture was more often a composite of stone, timber, glass, plaster and paint. Scarcity of precious materials prompted extraordinary experiments in fine metalworking techniques, resulting in objects of great refinement. Similarly, the expense and difficulties in the procurement and preparation of materials for manuscript production amplifies the achievements of Irish scribes working both at...

  15. 4 MONUMENTS OF CHRISTIANITY
    (pp. 121-223)

    The Church was the principal patron of the arts throughout the Middle Ages. Irish medieval architecture is practically synonymous with the medieval churches, abbeys and friaries that form the kernel of many modern Irish towns, or stand as ruined sentinels in now deserted rural landscapes.

    This section explores the development of building for the Christian Church throughout the medieval period. The unique character of early ecclesiastical settlements is explored in detail, from general overview to individual studies of constituent parts and case studies of particular significant settlements. The gradual transformation of the Church during the twelfth century was marked by...

  16. 5 ART OF WORSHIP AND DEVOTION
    (pp. 225-327)

    The paraphernalia of Christian worship was intended not only to be utilitarian, but also to evoke a sense of importance and of the mysteries of the faith. It is no coincidence that service books, altar plate and various furnishings associated with the liturgy are among the most lavishly ornate artefacts to survive from the medieval period. Devotion to the saints, whose lives and miracles were recorded in decorated texts, was also rooted in the concrete; holy bones or possessions were enshrined in decorated reliquaries and images of the saints provided a channel for prayer.

    This section quarries one of the...

  17. 6 SETTLEMENT AND SOCIETY
    (pp. 329-393)

    The manner in which the Irish landscape has been shaped by man, and modern patterns of settlement, have their genesis in the medieval period. The developments in agrarian practice and the introduction of new settlers brought about change. Social hierarchies were reflected in diverse housing types, from castles to more modest rural housing. Previously dispersed populations gravitated towards centres of population and urban centres were formed. In towns, communities living and trading together generated their own requirements, from defensive town walls to structures that catered for commerce and community life.

    This section provides an overview of the changing influences of...

  18. 7 ART AND IDENTITY
    (pp. 395-474)

    Emblems of status played a significant role in establishing social position in medieval Ireland. Dress – whether amour, vestments or fine quality secular clothing – was carefully codified, as was the jewellery or other insignia worn as an unambiguous statement of individual rank. Possession and display of hereditary plate and books, family tombs, heraldry and seals, demonstrated familial pedigree and helped to establish standing within the community. Corporate identity was expressed through the appropriate embellishment of charters recording rights and privileges, and the theatrical display of corporate power, bolstered by props such as civic regalia.

    This section deals with the...

  19. 8 PATRONS AND PRACTITIONERS
    (pp. 475-510)

    At the heart of any artwork lies the intentions and abilities of its creators. Patrons made deliberate choices in the work they sponsored, and the study of this can provide telling insights into medieval power, piety and politics and the reasons why Irish art history followed the course that it did. While the identity of many patrons was recorded for posterity, this is only rarely the case for the artist. This is not because of the artist’s status – the creators of most of the artworks dealt with in this volume were ranked among the more wealthy strata of society;...

  20. Appendix 1 SELECT HANDLIST OF ARTISTS AND CRAFTSMEN
    (pp. 511-543)
  21. Appendix 2 RECORDS OF ART AND ARCHITECTURAL PATRONAGE AT ATHENRY FRIARY
    (pp. 544-547)
  22. Appendix 3 THE OʹTUNNEY ATELIER, THEIR CLIENTS AND DISTRIBUTION OF THEIR WORK
    (pp. 548-549)
  23. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 550-552)
  24. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 553-554)
  25. INDEX
    (pp. 555-575)
  26. PHOTOGRAPHIC CREDITS
    (pp. 576-576)
  27. Back Matter
    (pp. 577-577)