Painting

Painting

Andrew Carpenter General Editor
Nicola Figgis Editor
Maria Arnold
Nesta Butler
Elizabeth Mayes Text Editor
Volume: II
Copyright Date: 2015
Edition: 1
Published by: Royal Irish Academy
Pages: 555
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt14jxtwj
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  • Book Info
    Painting
    Book Description:

    Art and Architecture of Ireland is an authoritative and fully illustrated survey encompassing the period from the early Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. This complete five volume set explores all aspects of Irish art – from high crosses to installation art, from illuminated manuscripts to Georgian houses and Modernist churches, from tapestries and sculptures to oil paintings, photographs and video art. This monumental project provides new insights into every facet of the strength, depth and variety of Ireland’s artistic and architectural heritage.

    eISBN: 978-1-908996-63-3
    Subjects: Art & Art History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-v)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. vi-vi)
    James Slevin

    As theArt and Architecture of Ireland(AAI) reaches publication, the Royal Irish Academy wishes to acknowledge those who brought the idea of this major project to the Academy and to express its gratitude and appreciation to the funders who made such an ambitious undertaking possible.

    In the spring of 2007, two art historians from University College Dublin, Nicola Figgis and Paula Murphy, asked the Academy to consider supporting a project to update Walter Strickland’s celebratedA Dictionary of Irish Artists(1913). I, as president, turned to one of the Academy’s members, Carmel Naughton, for advice and direction. We organized...

  3. GENERAL EDITORʹS PREFACE
    (pp. vii-x)
    Andrew Carpenter
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. xi-xiii)
  5. PREFACE
    (pp. xiv-xiv)
    Nicola Figgis
  6. EXPLANATORY NOTES
    (pp. xv-xv)
  7. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. xvi-xvii)
    Nicola Figgis
  8. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. xviii-xix)
  9. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xx-xxii)
  10. SELECT CHRONOLOGY
    (pp. xxiii-xxix)
  11. (pp. 1-10)

    Although Ireland lies on the periphery of Europe, artistic ideas and artists flowed freely into and out of the country during the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In attempting to give an account of Irish artists active during this period, this volume necessarily covers a wide variety of topics. In some cases, newly discovered biographical material amends existing biographies of artists; in others, cultural activity in Ireland is explored in art historical or socio-economic terms. The picture of Irish painters and painting which emerges is, as anyone familiar with the tortured history of Ireland between the Battle of Kinsale and...

  12. 1 CONNOISSEURSHIP AND THE ART MARKET
    (pp. 11-22)

    Registrar and Acting Director of the National Gallery of Ireland, and scholar, Strickland was a long-standing and prominent member of the National Gallery of Ireland staff [11, 12], but is best remembered for his seminalA Dictionary of Irish Artists, published in two volumes in 1913, and still a standard work, upon which this volume ofArt and Architecture of Irelandis based.

    The son of Thomas (1826–1902) and Margaret (née Biggar), Walter Strickland was born on 5 June 1850 in the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, where his father was serving as a clerk in the British...

  13. 2 ART INSTITUTIONS AND TRAINING IN IRELAND AND ABROAD
    (pp. 23-49)

    Until the mid-1830s, Belfast was devoid of any kind of art institution other than a number of small private drawing schools and the drawing classes of the Royal Belfast Academical Institution, the premier seat of learning for the sons of the professional and merchant classes [24]. A dedicated art school, funded by government – the Belfast Government School of Design – was not to be opened until 1849, thirteen years after the founding of the Belfast Association of Artists, the first exhibiting society in town.

    The Association was almost certainly the idea of local landscape painter Hugh Frazer (qv), who...

  14. 3 SUBJECTS AND GENRES
    (pp. 50-108)

    More than any other form of art, heraldic painting is a contemporary visual reflection of Ireland’s history. For the Old English nobility, heraldry probably developed in a similar fashion to elsewhere in Europe. Its adoption by the Gaelic princes was hindered by their preference for genealogy and for collateral rather than lineal succession, although the latter was introduced in some Gaelic kingships as early as the fourteenth century. This accelerated as links with the Old English and English administration became more commonplace, culminating in the sixteenth century in a more widespread use of heraldry, particularly by prominent Gaelic families such...

  15. 4 CULTURAL IMPACT AND INFLUENCE
    (pp. 109-137)

    Literary texts have provided the basis and inspiration for paintings throughout much of the history of western European art. Scenes from Homer were painted on Greek vases in the fifth century BC; early Christian art depicted biblical scenes (the Bible having a literary as well a religious dimension); and in the Middle Ages a complex iconography was developed to instruct the faithful through visual narratives. This continued as a powerful strand in Renaissance painting, which also reflected the revival of interest in the literature of Greece and Rome, but by now contemporary secular texts, especially epic poetry, were also inspiring...

  16. 5 METHODS AND MATERIALS
    (pp. 138-151)

    The necessary materials to equip an artist fully could be obtained from a variety of sources. As early as the middle of the seventeenth century, the trade of colourman, or supplier of artists’ materials, emerged in London and later appeared in other cities in Britain and Ireland. Colourmen obviated some of the time-consuming tasks, previously undertaken by artists or their apprentices, by supplying ground pigments, oils, ready-mixed paints, primed canvases and brushes [142, 143].

    Before the appearance of colourmen, and in keeping with a tradition originating from the Italian Renaissance practice, raw pigment (colour) had been purchased from apothecaries or...

  17. 6 BIOGRAPHIES
  18. Appendix SOCIETY OF ARTISTS OF IRELAND
    (pp. 521-521)
  19. GLOSSARY
    (pp. 522-523)
  20. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 524-535)
  21. INDEX
    (pp. 536-554)
  22. PHOTOGRAPHIC CREDITS
    (pp. 555-556)
  23. Back Matter
    (pp. 557-557)