The Bonhoeffer Legacy

The Bonhoeffer Legacy: Australasian Journal of Bonhoeffer Studies, Volume 1

Terence Lovat
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: ATF (Australia) Ltd.
Pages: 166
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt163t8jp
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  • Book Info
    The Bonhoeffer Legacy
    Book Description:

    1. Bonhoeffer and Biblical Interpretation: The Early Years Sean Winter 2. Same-Sex Marriage, the Australian Christian Lobby, and the Politicisation of Dietrich Bonhoeffer Mark Lindsay 3. Etsi deus non daretur: Bonhoeffer’s Useful Misuse of Grotius’ Maxim and its Implications for Evangelisation in the World Come of Age Kevin Lenehan 4. Bonhoeffer and the Yoke of Discipleship in Contemporary Australia Maurice Schild 5. ‘Hospitality’ at the End of Religion John McDowell 6. Bonhoeffer and the Politics of the Divine Veronica Brady IBVM 7. Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Professor Gerhard Ritter: Two Kinds of Lutherans and the Problem of Opposition to Nazism John Moses 8. ‘Self-Other’ or ‘Other-Self-Other’? A Conversation Between Bonhoeffer and Levinas on Vulnerability Daniel Fleming and Terence Lovat

    eISBN: 978-1-922239-61-7
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Editorial
    (pp. v-vi)
    Terence Lovat
  4. Bonhoeffer and Biblical Interpretation: The Early Years
    (pp. 1-15)
    Sean F Winter

    This article surveys Bonhoeffer’s early education in biblical studies, with a focus on his different encounters with Adolf Schlatter and Karl Barth. I propose that Bonhoeffer’s understanding of the tools of the historical-critical method in relation to a theologically focussed form of biblical interpretation was formed in this initial period, and that the relationship between history and revelation that he landed upon was not antithetical but complementary. Historical criticism was the servant of interpreting the Bible as revealed Scripture, but it was nevertheless an essential aspect of the interpretative process. The idea that ‘Bonhoeffer’s use of the Bible is the...

  5. Same-Sex Marriage, the Australian Christian Lobby, and the Politicisation of Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    (pp. 16-33)
    Mark Lindsay

    In October 2006, the then Australian Opposition Leader Kevin Rudd wrote an article forThe Monthlyin which he brought Dietrich Bonhoeffer briefly into the Australian public political consciousness. Rudd, who at the time was spruiking his credentials for the prime ministership through various social media and popular television shows like Channel 7’ sSunrise, wrote that Bonhoeffer was ‘without doubt the man I admire most in the history of the twentieth century’.¹ While Rudd’s own Christian faith was no secret, this was surely a strange and risky identification to make for someone who was seeking the highest office in...

  6. Etsi deus non daretur: Bonhoeffer’s useful misuse of Grotius’ maxim and its implications for evangelisation in the world come of age
    (pp. 34-60)
    Kevin Lenehan

    ‘Let us weigh up the gain and the loss involved in calling heads that God exists. Let us assess the two cases: if you win you win everything, if you lose you lose nothing. Do not hesitate then, wager that he does exist.’¹ So runs the famous ‘wager’ proposed by the scientist and Christian apologist, Blaise Pascal (1623–1662), to those of his contemporaries who were uncertain of God’s existence, convinced by neither reason nor revelation. Once the urgency of the issue has been grasped, Pascal insists, no one can stand unmoved in the face of the question of God’s...

  7. Bonhoeffer and the Yoke of Discipleship in Contemporary Australia
    (pp. 61-78)
    Maurice Schild

    This paper touches on dynamic constitutive dimensions of Bonhoeffer’s life as a twentieth century Christian and disciple. In so doing it discerns the actuality of discipleship in his life and death as being integral to his legacy for those who follow. In his case the call of the Master meant a particular journey and its culmination in martyrdom; but the call is to Christians of every time and place to accompany the Christ who died. The paper is therefore unapologetic about linking Bonhoeffer and his witness with the challenges which face believers living among the cultural modes and religious ambivalences...

  8. ‘Hospitality’ at the End of Religion
    (pp. 79-103)
    John C McDowell

    So much has been written about the theologian from central Europe Dietrich Bonhoeffer as prophet, martyr, priest, that one of the challenges is to find something new and interesting to say about him. Too much passes the lips of hagiographers again to be in any way valuable in its right, slipping into an overextending of his life and work in what one might well call a hagiographic hubris – even a hagiographic hamartia. For too much writing he is made banal and sentimental, tamed by the emotivism that surrounds talk of him as something of a heroic white knight who rides...

  9. Bonhoeffer and the Politics of the Divine
    (pp. 104-114)
    Veronica Brady

    ‘Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s and to God the things that are God’s.’ We all know the saying but history tells us how ambiguous it is. Like it or not, we all inhabit the City of Man. The cross, however, insists on the tension, sometimes an apparent antagonism, which exists between it and the reign of God. Bonhoeffer was profoundly aware of it: ‘God lets himself be pushed out of the world on to the cross’, he wrote, going on to argue therefore that ‘we cannot be honest unless we recognize that we have to live in...

  10. Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Professor Gerhard Ritter: Two Kinds of Lutherans and the Problem of Opposition to Nazism
    (pp. 115-132)
    John A Moses

    Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–1945) is today acknowledged world-wide as arguably the most significant German theologian since Martin Luther, and this is due to the stand he took against the palpable evil of National Socialism and his consequent martyrdom under the dictatorship of, Adolf Hitler, 1933–1945. Gerhard Ritter (1888–1967), the doyen of modern German historians during his later life, was also a most devout Lutheran and had been imprisoned by the Nazis in the last months of the Second World War for his part in conspiring against the regime. He is now remembered by a remnant of scholars interested...

  11. ‘Self-Other’ or ‘Other-Self-Other’? A Conversation between Bonhoeffer and Levinas on Vulnerability
    (pp. 133-149)
    Daniel Flemming and Terrence Lovat

    The article focuses on the understanding of vulnerability that is found in the thought of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Emmanuel Levinas. For Bonhoeffer, vulnerability is best understood as a form of ‘vulnerable discipleship’, that is, a choosing to be vulnerable for the other which aligns with his understanding of costly grace. For Levinas, vulnerability is primarily concerned with the vulnerability of the other person and, later in his thought, the vulnerability of the subject who is responsible for the other person. In exploring the grounds for possible conversation between these two thinkers, we argue that Levinas has potential to offer a...

  12. Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy: A Righteous Gentile Vs. The Third Reich (Nashville, Tenn: Thomas Nelson, 2010). 561 pages, 16 pages of plates. ISBN 9781595551382 (hbk), 1595551387 (hbk)
    (pp. 150-153)
    Bruce Kaye
  13. Review of Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy: A Righteous Gentile vs. the Third Reich (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2010), pp. 608, ISBN 1595551387.
    (pp. 154-158)
    Victoria J Barnett
  14. Contributors
    (pp. 159-160)