New England Wild Flower Society's Flora Novae Angliae

New England Wild Flower Society's Flora Novae Angliae: A Manual for the Identification of Native and Naturalized Higher Vascular Plants of New England

Arthur Haines
Elizabeth Farnsworth
Gordon Morrison
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 1008
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1np7h4
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  • Book Info
    New England Wild Flower Society's Flora Novae Angliae
    Book Description:

    This comprehensive manual offers accurate, up-to-date, and clear information for identifying New England's remarkable array of tracheophytes (vascular plants, excluding mosses). With fully researched entries on some 3,500 native and nonnative species, the book is the first in decades to provide a complete and correct botanical reference for the region's noncultivated plants. The volume includes many new species not documented in New England before, while also excluding many species that have erroneously appeared in earlier manuals.

    Focusing on the taxonomy and distribution of New England plants, the manual is largely dedicated to identification keys and to species entries that provide scientific name, origin, regional conservation ranking, common name, synonyms, distribution, ecology, and other miscellaneous items of interest. Nearly one-third of the entries are accompanied by helpful black-and-white line illustrations.

    Additional special features: •Precise distribution information, accurate to the state level•Details on unusual plant groups not included in other sources•Reliable and versatile keys for identification•Tips on recognizing hybrid plants in the field•A companion interactive teaching Web site (under development)•Comprehensive glossary

    eISBN: 978-0-300-18475-4
    Subjects: Botany & Plant Sciences, Biological Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. [Map]
    (pp. vi-vi)
  4. Preface
    (pp. vii-viii)
    Debbi Edelstein
  5. Acknowledgments
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. Introduction
    (pp. xi-xvi)

    New England is composed of the six northeastern-most states—Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont (map, p. vi). Though it is somewhat of an arbitrarily defined area, it does have some degree of natural boundaries, including the Atlantic Ocean on much of its eastern border, the St. John River on portions of its northern and northeastern border, Lake Champlain on its northwestern border, the Berkshires and included watersheds (e.g., Housatonic River) on or near its western border, and Long Island sound on its southern border. It is considered to have a well-studied flora, and several manuals have...

  7. Glossary of Terminology
    (pp. xvii-xxxiv)
  8. Key to the Families
    (pp. 1-38)

    1a. Plants typically reproducing by spores, seeds and fruits not produced; gametophyte independent of sporophyte; ferns and fern-like plants … … … … … … … … … . . Group 1

    1b. Plants typically reproducing by seeds, the seeds borne within a fruit or not; gametophyte dependent on sporophyte; seed plants

    2a. Plants not producing true flowers; seeds commonly borne in strobili on the surface of a scale (embedded in a fleshy aril in Taxus), never enclosed in an ovary; styles and stigmas absent; trees and shrubs with narrow, scale- or needle-like, usually persistent, leaves … … … … …...

  9. Lycophytes
    (pp. 39-50)

    1a. Trophophylls dimorphic, those in the apical portion of the shoot noticeably shorter and more ascending than those near the base [Fig. 1]; gemmiphores borne throughout the apical portion of plant; lateral leaves of gemmae 0.5–1.1(–1.2)mm wide, narrow-acute to acute at the apex; shoots determinate, the entire stem turning yellow on senescence … ….H.appressa

    1b. Trophophylls nearly monomorphic, those near the apex neither conspicuously smaller nor more ascending than those near the base; gemmiphores borne in a single whorl at the apex of a season’s growth; lateral leaves of gemmae 1.3–2.5mm wide, obtuse to rounded...

  10. Monilophytes
    (pp. 51-74)

    1a. Leaf blades simple, frequently rooting at the tip; venation reticulate; sori irregularly scattered over the blade … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .A.rhizophyllum

    1b. Leaf blades 1- to 3-times divided [Figs. 17, 18], not rooting at the tip; venation free (i.e., the veins not rejoining); sori in paired rows on the leaflets

    2a. At least the larger leaflets divided into leafules [Figs. 17, 18]; leaf blades deltate or deltate-ovate to lanceolate or obovate, with 2–10 pairs of leaflets

    3a. Leaf blades usually with 2–5 pairs...

  11. Gymnosperms
    (pp. 75-80)

    1a. Seed cones fleshy and resembling a firm berry, the scales not opening [Fig. 43]; seeds not winged; abaxial glands on leaves elliptic to elongate … … … … … … … … … .Juniperus

    1b. Seed cones woody, the scales opening and exposing the axis; seeds winged; abaxial glands on leaves circular or oval to elliptic

    2a. Branchlets terete or tetragonous; alternating pairs of leaves similar; seed cones nearly spherical, with peltate scales; abaxial leaf glands circular [Fig. 41] … … . .Chamaecyparis

    2b. Branchlets flat; alternating pairs of leaves dimorphic—those of the upper and lower...

  12. Magnoliids
    (pp. 81-86)

    1a. Plants without aerial stems, herbaceous; calyx actinomorphic, the basal, tubular portion straight; flowers with 12 stamens … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .Asarum

    1b. Plants with aerial stems, woody or herbaceous; calyx zygomorphic, the basal, tubular portion nearly straight or strongly bent [Fig. 50]; flowers with 6 stamens

    2a. Leaf blades 1–5cm wide, pinnately veined; inflorescence originating from base of stem near ground level; capsule globose, 8–20mm long … … … … … … … .Endodeca

    2b. Leaf blades 5–35 cm wide, palmately veined;...

  13. Monocots
    (pp. 87-306)

    Acorus was traditionally placed in the Araceae. This erroneous placement of the genus was partly due to incorrect interpretation of the distal portion of the sympodial leaf—a structure that had been considered to be a spathe. Two species are now recognized to occur in our area. Acorus calamus is a sterile triploid that has been introduced from Europe. Acorus americanus is a fertile diploid native to North America. References: Haines (2000a), Thompson (2000a).

    1a. Secondary veins of dried leaf blades up to ca. 0.5 times the width of the midvein (i.e., leaves with 1 prominent midvein and numerous finer,...

  14. Tricolpates
    (pp. 307-890)

    1a. Leaf blades pinnately divided into 3–11 leaflets; drupe with 3–5 pyrenes; terminal bud absent … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … . .Sambucus

    1b. Leaf blades simple, lobed or unlobed [Figs. 314, 315]; drupe with a single seed; terminal bud present … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .Viburnum

    Sambucus

    1a. Inflorescence with a main axis that extends beyond the lowermost branches [Fig. 311]; pith of branches...

  15. Literature Cited
    (pp. 891-916)
  16. Index
    (pp. 917-973)
  17. Back Matter
    (pp. 974-974)