Psychology and Religion

Psychology and Religion

CARL GUSTAV JUNG
Copyright Date: 1938
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 138
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1np8d4
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  • Book Info
    Psychology and Religion
    Book Description:

    Dr. Carl Gustav Jung, author of some of the most provocative hypotheses in modern psychology, describes what he regards as an authentic religious function in the unconscious mind. Using a wealth of material from ancient and medieval Gnostic, alchemistic, and occultistic literature, he discusses the religious symbolism of unconscious processes and the possible continuity of religious forms that have appeared and reappeared through the centuries."These compact vigorous essays constitute Dr. Jung's most sustained interpretation of the religious function in individual experience."-Journal of Social Philosophy

    eISBN: 978-0-300-16650-7
    Subjects: Psychology, Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iv])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [v]-[vi])
  3. I THE AUTONOMY OF THE UNCONSCIOUS MIND
    (pp. 1-39)

    AS it seems to be the intention of the founder of the Terry Lectures to enable representatives of science, as well as of philosophy and of other spheres of human knowledge, to contribute to the discussion of the eternal problem of religion, and since Yale University has bestowed upon me the great honor of delivering the Terry Lectures of 1937, I assume that it will be my task to show what psychology, or rather that special branch of medical psychology which I represent, has to do with or to say about religion. Since religion is incontestably one of the earliest...

  4. II DOGMA AND NATURAL SYMBOLS
    (pp. 40-77)

    THE first of these dreams—the one preceding the church dream—speaks of a ceremony through which an ape is to be reconstructed. To explain this point sufficiently would require too many details. I must, therefore, restrict myself to the mere statement that the “ape” refers to the dreamer’s instinctive personality which he had completely neglected in favor of an exclusively intellectual attitude. The result had been that his instincts got the better of him and attacked him at times in uncontrollable outbursts. The “reconstruction” of the ape means the rebuilding of the instinctive personality within the framework of the...

  5. III THE HISTORY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF A NATURAL SYMBOL
    (pp. 78-114)

    ALTHOUGH I do not want to discourage philosophical curiosity, I prefer not to lose myself in a discussion of the ethical and intellectual aspects of the problem raised by the quaternity symbol. Its psychological effects are certainly far-reaching and meaningful enough. They play a considerable role in practical treatment. While we are not concerned here with psychotherapy, but with the religious aspect of psychical phenomena, I have been forced through my studies in psychopathology to dig out these historical symbols and figures from the dust of their graves.¹ When I was a young alienist I should never have suspected myself...

  6. NOTES
    (pp. 115-131)
  7. Back Matter
    (pp. 132-133)