A Common Faith

A Common Faith

JOHN DEWEY
Copyright Date: 1962
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 96
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1npdn9
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  • Book Info
    A Common Faith
    Book Description:

    One of America's greatest philosophers outlines a faith that is not confined to sect, class, or race. Dr. Dewey calls for the emancipation of the true religious quality from the heritage of dogmatism and supernaturalism that characterizes historical religions. He describes a positive, practical, and dynamic faith, verified and supported by the intellect and evolving with the progress of social and scientific knowledge."The pure distillation of the thought of a great mind on the great subject of religion."-John Haynes Holmes,New York Herald Tribune

    eISBN: 978-0-300-17346-8
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. I RELIGION VERSUS THE RELIGIOUS
    (pp. 1-28)

    Never before in history has mankind been so much of two minds, so divided into two camps, as it is today. Religions have traditionally been allied with ideas of the supernatural, and often have been based upon explicit beliefs about it. Today there are many who hold that nothing worthy of being called religious is possible apart from the supernatural. Those who hold this belief differ in many respects. They range from those who accept the dogmas and sacraments of the Greek and Roman Catholic church as the only sure means of access to the supernatural to the theist or...

  4. II FAITH AND ITS OBJECT
    (pp. 29-58)

    All religions, as I pointed out in the preceding chapter, involve specific intellectual beliefs, and they attach—some greater, some less—importance to assent to these doctrines as true, true in the intellectual sense. They have literatures held especially sacred, containing historical material with which the validity of the religions is connected. They have developed a doctrinal apparatus it is incumbent upon “believers” (with varying degrees of strictness in different religions) to accept. They also insist that there is some special and isolated channel of access to the truths they hold.

    No one will deny, I suppose, that the present...

  5. III THE HUMAN ABODE OF THE RELIGIOUS FUNCTION
    (pp. 59-87)

    In discussing the intellectual content of religion before considering religion in its social connections, I did not follow the usual temporal order. Upon the whole, collective modes of practice either come first or are of greater importance. The core of religions has generally been found in rites and ceremonies. Legends and myths grow up in part as decorative dressings, in response to the irrepressible human tendency toward storytelling, and in part as attempts to explain ritual practices. Then as culture advances, stories are consolidated, and theogonies and cosmogonies are formed—as with the Babylonians, Egyptians, Hebrews and Greeks. In the...

  6. Back Matter
    (pp. 88-88)