Arabic Second Language Acquisition of Morphosyntax

Arabic Second Language Acquisition of Morphosyntax

MOHAMMAD T. ALHAWARY
Copyright Date: 2009
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 240
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1nprr7
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  • Book Info
    Arabic Second Language Acquisition of Morphosyntax
    Book Description:

    While the demand for Arabic classes and preparation programs for Arabic language teachers has increased, there is a notable gap in the field of linguistic research on learning Arabic as a second language.Arabic Second Language Acquisition of Morphosyntaxpresents a data-driven and systematic analysis of Arabic language acquisition that responds to this growing need.

    Based on large data samples collected from longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, this book explores a broad range of structures and acquisition issues. It also introduces new and comprehensive research, and it documents the successes and problems that native speakers of other languages, including English, Spanish, French, and Japanese, are likely to encounter in learning Arabic.

    By integrating previously published findings with new research, the author has created a unified and streamlined resource for teachers, teachers-in-training, linguists, Arabic textbook authors, and second-language acquisition experts.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-15915-8
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-x)
  3. Preface
    (pp. xi-xii)
  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  5. Introduction
    (pp. xv-xviii)

    The objectives of this book are to provide data-driven findings as well as systematic analysis of second language acquisition (SLA) of Arabic. Little has been published on Arabic second language acquisition. Studies that have appeared so far either focus on a limited set of structures or suffer from methodological limitations related mostly to elicitation techniques and small data samples. This book aims at exploring a broad range of structures and acquisition issues based on large data samples collected longitudinally (from 9 participants over a school year) and cross-sectionally (over the past ten years from 109 participants with three different lengths...

  6. Transliteration Symbols
    (pp. xix-xx)
  7. Abbreviations
    (pp. xxi-xxii)
  8. CHAPTER 1 Description of Target Morphosyntactic Structures
    (pp. 1-20)

    The description provided here relates primarily to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), which is essentially the same as Classical Arabic (CA), though the former is somewhat more simplified syntactically and generally more restricted in optional rule use. Significant differences between the two will be pointed out in the course of this chapter to indicate that both versions are acceptable grammatically. Indeed, current Arabic textbooks in use—which constitute the learners’ language input—seem to follow the MSA tendency. The description is not intended to be exhaustive but rather focuses on aspects of the language relevant to the data investigated and on...

  9. CHAPTER 2 Existing Arabic Second Language Acquisition Research
    (pp. 21-48)

    Before presenting an overview of second language acquisition (SLA) studies conducted on Arabic as a second language (L2), it is necessary to offer a definition of what second language acquisition is and how it differs from foreign language pedagogy. Whereas foreign language pedagogy is concerned with the various approaches, methods, and techniques of how a foreign/second language should be taught, the field of second language acquisition is concerned with how a language is learned. In other words, while foreign language pedagogy reflects the teacher’s perspective, SLA instead focuses on the learner, including the nature of the learner’s developing language or...

  10. CHAPTER 3 The Acquisition of Gender Agreement
    (pp. 49-100)

    This chapter discusses acquisition of gender agreement based on both longitudinal and cross-sectional data from native English L1, French L1, and Japanese L1 speakers learning Arabic as an L2. The target structures focused on here include nominal gender agreement, as in (14)-(17) (restated below as (1)-(4)), demonstrative gender agreement, as in (23)-(26) and (29) (restated below as (5)-(9)), and verbal agreement, as in (47)-(48) and (51)-(52) (restated below as (10)-(13)) discussed in Chapter 1.

    Eight English L1 speakers and one French L1 speaker were observed longitudinally for a school year. Table 3.1 (below) displays the demographic data of the participants....

  11. CHAPTER 4 The Acquisition of Tense/Aspect and Verbal Agreement
    (pp. 101-114)

    This chapter discusses acquisition of tense/aspect and verbal agreement based on cross-sectional data from native English L1, Spanish L1, and Japanese L1 speakers learning Arabic as a second/foreign language (L2). The target structures focused on here include tense/aspect (past/perfective and present/imperfective) and verbal (S-V) agreement, as in sentences (47)-(48) and (51)-(52) discussed in Chapter 1 and restated below as (1)-(4).

    Eighty-three Arabic L2 learners belonging to three different native language backgrounds, (American) English, Spanish, and Japanese, were invited to participate in the study in their home institutions in the United States, Spain, and Japan, respectively. The participants were grouped according...

  12. CHAPTER 5 The Acquisition of Null Subjects
    (pp. 115-124)

    This chapter discusses acquisition of null subjects based on cross-sectional data from native English L1, Spanish L1, and Japanese L1 speakers learning Arabic as an L2. The target structure of null subjects is of the non-embedded construction type, as illustrated in sentences (44)-(45) discussed in Chapter 1 and restated below as (1)-(2), where use of an overt pronominal or NP/lexical subject in the matrix (main) clause is optional.

    Eighty-three Arabic L2 learners belonging to three different L1s, (American) English, Spanish, and Japanese, were invited to participate in the study at their home institutions in the United States, Spain, and Japan,...

  13. CHAPTER 6 The Acquisition of Negation, Mood, and Case
    (pp. 125-146)

    This chapter discusses acquisition of negation as well as the morphological inflections of case and mood based on longitudinal data from native English L1 speakers learning Arabic as an L2. The negation constructions focused on here include the use oflā, mā, lam, andlan, as in sentences (55)-(58) and (61)-(64) discussed in Chapter 1 and restated below as (1)-(8).

    The morphological inflections of mood that are focused on include the indicative (on the default imperfect stem and imperfect stem following the negation particle), the jussive (following the negation particlelam), and the subjunctive (following the negation particlelan),...

  14. CHAPTER 7 Theoretical Implications
    (pp. 147-172)

    This chapter relates the findings reported on in the foregoing chapters (3-6) to the most recent second language acquisition (SLA) models and hypotheses as well as to central issues to do with language learnability and processability, L1 transfer, Universal Grammar (UG) access, and ultimate attainment. The chapter discusses in specific ways how the findings contribute to cross-linguistic evidence on these issues.

    One of the most recent well-formulated attempts at explaining learnability/teachability and processability of second language grammatical development is Processability Theory (PT), formulated by Pienemann (1998). Although the PT model is claimed to account for syntactic phenomena as well as...

  15. CHAPTER 8 Pedagogical and Applied Implications
    (pp. 173-182)

    This chapter aims at explaining implications and suggesting practical applications of the findings in a number of subfields of Arabic applied linguistics, including Arabic curriculum design, Arabic foreign language teaching pedagogy, teacher preparation, and Arabic proficiency testing. Such areas can be informed by Arabic SLA data through knowledge of acquisition tendencies, especially time and pattern of emergence of the structures investigated, and other factors that may contribute to L2 acquisition. The chapter will first discuss what information the data reported on here can generally offer in the way of Arabic acquisition tendencies and emergence patterns and then identify who can...

  16. Notes
    (pp. 183-198)
  17. Glossary
    (pp. 199-204)
  18. References
    (pp. 205-214)
  19. Index
    (pp. 215-218)