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Foreword by David Hare
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 96
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1nq3sm
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  • Book Info
    blu
    Book Description:

    Memory, history, and culture collide with the starlit rooftop dreams of a myth-inspired character as Soledad and her partner, Hailstorm, redefine family on their own terms after the death of their eldest son in Iraq.blu,steeped in poetic realism and contemporary politics, challenges us to try to imagine a time before war.

    Selected as the winner of the 2010 Yale Drama competition from more than 950 submissions, Virginia Grise's playblutakes place in the present but looks back on the not too distant past through a series of prayers, rituals, and dreams. Contest judge David Hare commented, "Virginia Grise is a blazingly talented writer, and her playblustays with you a long time after you've read it." Noting that 2010 was a banner year for women playwrights, he added, "Women's writing for the theatre is stronger and more eloquent than it has ever been."

    eISBN: 978-0-300-17822-7
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. ix-xiv)
    David Hare

    The publication ofbluin this beautiful edition brings to an end my tenure choosing the winner of the Yale Drama Series. I inherited the job from the founding judge, Edward Albee, and I am now content to hand it over to John Guare, confident that he will bring a special energy and expertise to the role. But before I do, it’s worth recording how enlightening I have found the experience over two years of supervising the reading of 1,500 unpublished plays in the English language.

    Sometime in the 1980s, I served briefly on the jury of another prize, exclusively...

  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xv-xviii)
  5. Blu
    (pp. 1-58)

    Time: Present day, looking back on the not too distant past, through a series of memories, dreams, rituals, and prayers.

    Place: The barrio. The United States of America.

    Author’s Note:

    Style:This text, though rooted in real experiences, was not conceived or written in a naturalistic mode. The directing style, therefore, should serve the music, movement, and mysticism intrinsic to the script.

    There are moments when characters speak the same lines and have the same memory. At other times, characters interrupt and take over each other’s monologues because they live a shared experience. These voices should not be in unsion...

  6. Glossary
    (pp. 59-59)