Above The City

Above The City: Hiking Hong Kong Island

Alicia M. Kershaw
Ginger Thrash
Copyright Date: 2005
Edition: 1
Pages: 184
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt24hkv1
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  • Book Info
    Above The City
    Book Description:

    Above the City: Hiking Hong Kong Island is a unique comprehensive guide to walks and hikes on Hong Kong Island. Many Hong Kong residents and visitors enjoy a few famous hikes, but then are at a loss to find more routes. Above the City takes the walking enthusiast beyond the well-trodden paths and explores all the walks available on Hong Kong Island. Walkers can find outings to suit their every mood, and variations on well-known and well-loved walks. Every walking route on the Island is described in detail, including distance and difficulty ratings. The hikes are organized around 'hubs,' allowing easy identification. They also are indexed by special interests, such as routes that can be run, that are suitable for families, or the most scenic. Directions to the walks by public transportation and by car are provided, and local amenities, such as rest stops, restaurants and local historical sites are listed. Local residents who are seeking more walking choices, walking groups, or visitors to Hong Kong will find Above the City an invaluable hiking companion.

    eISBN: 978-988-220-001-2
    Subjects: Geography

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. ABOUT THIS GUIDE
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HONG KONG HIKING
    (pp. xi-xvi)
  6. Hub 1 Victoria Gap at The Peak
    • [HUB 1 Introduction]
      (pp. 1-10)

      Victoria Gap at the Peak is our number one hub for good reasons. It features numerous and varied walks, hikes, and running trails, many choices for a meal or refreshment, easy access, and fabulous views. There are also a few aggravations. Camera happy tourists, especially in groups, can impede a brisk walk or run; however, they don’t often stray far from the Peak Tramway station. Local residents also take full advantage of the area, especially on weekends, taking constitutionals, walking with their families or practicing Tai Chi. Enjoy the popular hikes at less busy times or with a dose of...

    • 1A HONG KONG TRAIL SECTION 1 — THE PEAK to POK FU LAM
      (pp. 11-14)

      We begin with the first section of the Hong Kong Trail, an excellent introduction to hiking in Hong Kong. The trail begins with fantastic views of Central Hong Kong and Victoria Harbor, stretching all the way to the New Territories; it then curls around the west end of the Island for views of Sulphur Channel and Lamma Island.

      The first part of the trail (which is also Hike 1C) gradually slopes uphill as it winds its way around the Peak. It is paved and wide enough for 2 or 3 people abreast. On weekdays you can see early morning walkers...

    • 1B THE MORNING TRAIL and CHEUNG PO TSAI PATH
      (pp. 15-21)

      A popular choice, the Morning Trail and Cheung Po Tsai Path route combines beautiful views and many fitness options. You can walk or run the first part, stopping to pump iron and enjoy the south side views at the fitness stations. Then, as you trot down the north side of Mount Austin towards Mid-levels on Hatton Road, you can stop by the Pinewood Battery and the Lung Fu Pavilion, both have remarkable views. After asking the blessing of a Buddha mounted on a slope, you can cross Lung Fu Shan on the Cheung Po Tsai Trail, said to be a...

    • 1C THE LOOP — HARLECH ROAD and LUGARD ROAD (POK FU LAM TREE WALK)
      (pp. 22-23)

      A rarity for hikes in Hong Kong, this trail is both flat (for the most part) and very scenic — but you can’t avoid a good-sized hill on the north side! A versatile choice, you can jog, run, walk, try your hand at the fitness course, and combine it with any number of other hikes. The views are among the best and include both the north and south sides of the Island. This is the perfect walk to show off Hong Kong to visiting friends and family.

      The loop combines Hikes 1A and 1B, starting with 1B.

      The trail begins...

    • 1D GOVERNOR’S WALK and VICTORIA PEAK GARDEN
      (pp. 24-25)

      This short scenic trail, tucked away at the top of Victoria Peak (552 m), treats you to a bonus: the lovely Victoria Peak Garden. The main part of the trail alternates flat sections with stairs around the south side of Mount Austin, parallel to but above Harlech Road; the rest twines through the garden, which is fun to explore. The trail is topped off by a large Pavilion, situated just right for enjoying the terrific views, on the site of Mountain Lodge, the summer residence for colonial Governors from 1867 to the Second World War.

      The trail begins at the...

    • 1E HIGH WEST (SAI KO SHAN)
      (pp. 26-26)

      Appropriately named, High West (494 m) offers panoramic views of the west end of the Island, with maps at the top to help you find the landmarks. You can see all the way to Cheung Chau Island in the west and the islands in the harbor to the east. Of course, you will have to work a bit for the reward, but it is definitely worth the effort to get there. Get your knees ready for lots of stairs. Short and sweet, High West makes a great addition to any of the hikes around the Peak Hub. Time and distance...

    • 1F OLD PEAK ROAD
      (pp. 27-28)

      Old Peak Road doesn’t offer much in the way of views, but it is one of our favorite short workout hikes. The trail offers verdant forest and gushing streams. You will have a real sense of accomplishment when you have finished, especially if you take it in reverse. The trail can be added to many of the Peak Hub hikes to make good loops. The good news: the road switchbacks down the hill (all but unknown in Hong Kong trails). The bad news: it is so steep that your knees and thighs will moan.

      We’ve been told that many older...

    • 1G CHATHAM PATH and CENTRAL GREEN TRAIL
      (pp. 29-30)

      Chatham Path winds down to Central through lush vegetation. One of two Green Trails in Hong Kong (the other is Wan Chai Green Trail, Hike 2A), the Central Green Trail includes educational signs along the way that point out specific trees and plants, even common weeds. A short detour off the trail takes you to a lovely little shrine. The lower half of the hike passes through built up areas and runs along the Peak Tramway tracks. At this point, the trail is “green” more for its environmental information than for its shrubbery.

      Start at the Peak Tramway Station. Facing...

    • 1H PEAK LOOPS
      (pp. 31-33)

      The many short paths and lightly trafficked roads of the Peak can be combined for diverse and charming hikes. This is good running territory too. Try some of these.

      Special views on a 2 km/1.25 mi walk or run, especially if you detour to the Matilda Hospital (1907). Starting at the intersection at the west end of the Peak Tramway Station, facing west, turn left and walk along Peak Road. At the shopping center, stay on the upper pavement, where the road surface is marked Plunkett’s Road. At the intersection, take the left fork (Plunkett’s Road} then turn right over...

    • 1J POK FU LAM RESERVOIR FAMILY WALK
      (pp. 34-36)

      Our version of the trail combines Pok Fu Lam Reservoir Road, which winds downhill under a cooling canopy of trees, and Hong Kong Trail Section 1, also leafy and cool but not very scenic. Other Family Walks are much less challenging, as the climb up Pok Fu Lam Reservoir Road is steep. We would think twice about getting young kids out on this one, but it’s a nice change of pace for adults. If you start at Pokfulam, it is a much easier hike.

      To access the trail, begin near the Peak Tramway Station. At the intersection at the west...

    • 1K HONG KONG TRAIL SECTION 2 — POK FU LAM RESERVOIR ROAD to PEEL RISE
      (pp. 37-40)

      The lovely trail, much of it wooded, wends its way through the hills above Pok Fu Lam. There are only a few views along the way but towards the finish the trail has some stupendous views of the south side of the Island: Aberdeen, Ap Lei Chau, the typhoon shelter, the channel and the outlying islands. At the end, heading down into Aberdeen, there are many steps, some up but many more down.

      The beginning of the hike is the same as Hike 1J, Pok Fu Lam Reservoir Family Walk.

      To access the trail, begin at the intersection at the...

    • 1L HONG KONG TRAIL SECTION 3 — PEEL RISE to WAN CHAI GAP
      (pp. 41-43)

      After an initial steep downhill stretch along Peel Rise to reach the trailhead, the trail itself is largely level and tree lined with lots of streambeds. This is a good walk for a hot day, when you want to get out but don’t want a lot of sun. There are some nice views but this is not one of the most scenic trails. The trail winds in and out of two canyons around Tin Wan Shan (252 m). Joggers will find this an excellent jogging trail. However, be prepared: at the end of your hike to return to the Peak...

    • 1M PEEL RISE — THE PEAK to ABERDEEN
      (pp. 44-45)

      So you want to get to Aberdeen but not on the bus? A walk down Peel Rise, a paved lane that wanders downhill under a canopy of trees, then alongside a stream and finally though an historic cemetery, is a delightful, scenic way to visit the south side. Be prepared for a long descent or ascent, depending on the direction you take. A good choice for a run, if you don’t mind hills.

      Up to the first junction, this hike is the same as Hike 1L.

      Starting at the intersection at the west end of the Peak Tramway Station, facing...

    • 1N MOUNT DAVIS TRAIL
      (pp. 46-48)

      This is a little known but worthwhile hike, with a good hill for a workout and beautiful views. Historical as well, Mount Davis (Mo Sing Leng) (269 m) is dotted with ruins of World War II defenses. One of the best kept secrets in town, the Youth Hostel at the top is a scenic rest stop where you can buy a snack. There also is a short detour that is suitable for running.

      You can approach Mount Davis a few different ways. We think the best routing is along the Reservoir Access Road (which intersects with Mount Davis Road) to...

    • 1P PIK SHAN PATH
      (pp. 49-52)

      Pik Shan Path is included for three reasons, none of them much related to scenic hiking. First, it’s a good running trail. Second, it’s a good way to get to Mount Davis (Hike 1N) on foot. Third, it’s a mystery, as no map we have seen identifies Pik Shan (in English anyway). A shady flat path, with pretty forest in only a few parts, this hike is utilitarian, not charming. Be warned that there is a bit of a climb to get up to the start. We describe the path from Kotewall Road, but it can also be accessed from...

  7. Hub 2 Wan Chai Gap
    • [HUB 2 Introduction]
      (pp. 53-58)

      The assortment of hikes radiating from Wan Chai Gap, in the middle of Hong Kong Island, ranges from flat Bowen Road to steep Wan Chai Gap Road. Wan Chai Gap gives you access to all of Aberdeen Country Park with its beautiful reservoirs and diverse trails. You can mix and match trails and then work your way back to the gap. Many of the hikes are also reasonable hikes for children and runners.

      Countryside Map Grid: 08–09 and 65–66

      By Bus:

      Bus No. 15 from Central or the Star Ferry, about a 30 min trip

      On Foot:

      From...

    • 2A WAN CHAI GAP ROAD and WAN CHAI GAP GREEN TRAIL
      (pp. 59-60)

      Enjoy a tree-shaded and quiet lane, only a few moments from the crowded streets of the city. A very steep trail, studded with informative markers about the plant life and ecosystems along the way, Wan Chai Gap Road is a good way to get to Bowen Road (Hike 2B). The transition from jungle to city (Queen’s Road East, Wan Chai) is almost too abrupt. This is not a long road by itself, but can be done as a round trip, or added to other walks to make some very nice loops.

      Starting at Wan Chai Gap Park, stand at the...

    • 2B BOWEN ROAD
      (pp. 61-63)

      A rare Hong Kong hike: a flat paved trail. Winding in and out of the canyons above the city below, Bowen Road is fun to walk or run. There are fine views of the city and many small shrines along the way. There is also a fitness course.

      Bowen Road is named after Sir George Bowen, Governor of Hong Kong from March 1883 to December 1885.

      You can access the trail from Wan Chai Gap (Hike 2A), but most people will start it at either end, so we have made an exception: instead of describing the trail from the Hub,...

    • 2C BLACK’S LINK
      (pp. 64-65)

      As it gradually rises and falls, offering views of both sides of the Island, Black’s Link offers a nice walk by itself or added on to other hikes. It’s a good choice for runners. The road was named after Major General W. Black, General Officer commanding in Hong Kong in the late nineteenth century. He had the road built between Wong Nai Chung Gap and Magazine Gap, most likely in the late 1890s, to help get military troops to the Peak, where there were barracks and a hospital.

      Starting at Wan Chai Gap Park, stand at the intersection of Peak...

    • 2D MIDDLE GAP ROAD
      (pp. 66-66)

      Middle Gap Road is a good way to access several Wan Chai Gap hikes and runs. Open to cars, but lightly traveled, Middle Gap Road passes some unique homes. Our favorite is the mini Parthenon.

      Starting at Wan Chai Gap Park, stand at the intersection of Peak Road and Stubbs Road with the park behind you. Turn to the right and take the hill, Middle Gap Road, on the far side of Mount Cameron Road.

      Walk up Middle Gap Road, starting with a pretty good climb, past the amazing homes. After you start back downhill, two paths on the left...

    • 2E ABERDEEN COUNTRY PARK HIKES
      (pp. 67-75)

      Aberdeen Country Park is an especially fun area to wander around. Four clearly marked trails are described in detail below; you can also mix and match. The trails are good for kids, as the reservoirs provide lots to see. The park also contains the P.H.A.B. BBQ area, with tables adapted to the disabled and exercise equipment (and toilets) and a wheelchair hike. The Nature Trail identifies trees and plants along the trail. The Fitness Trail/Red Walk provides opportunities to increase your heart rate, such as pull ups and sit ups, and can be run. The Blue Walk has some demanding...

    • 2F HONG KONG TRAIL SECTION 4 — WAN CHAI GAP to WONG NAI CHUNG GAP
      (pp. 76-80)

      You will enjoy beautiful south side views all along this trail, but beware, it is a more challenging trail than some maps suggest, as you climb up and down a fair amount. About mid-way, there is a sheltered picnic spot with especially good views, a perfect place to stop for lunch. There are lengthy flat parts that are good for running, interspersed with stairs. The trail includes a Tree Walk and follows part of Lady Clementi’s Ride; see Hike 3H.

      Starting at Wan Chai Gap Park, stand at the intersection of Peak Road and Stubbs Road with the park behind...

  8. Hub 3 Wong Nai Chung Gap
    • [HUB 3 Introduction]
      (pp. 81-90)

      Wong Nai Chung Gap is full of hiking opportunities in Tai Tam Country Park, especially for hikers looking for challenges and spectacular views. This Hub has it all: peaks, reservoirs, splendid views, and stairs, stairs, stairs. Your sore muscles may not thank you, but your mirror will. There are some gentle hikes too.

      Countryside Map Grid: 10–11 and 64

      By Bus:

      Bus No. 6 or 66 from Central and from Stanley. Get off at the gas station at the crest of the hill. If your chosen hike starts at Parkview you will have to walk up Tai Tam Reservoir...

    • 3A HONG KONG TRAIL SECTION 5 (MOUNT BUTLER) — WONG NAI CHUNG GAP to MOUNT PARKER ROAD
      (pp. 91-93)

      One of the most difficult yet prettiest sections of the Hong Kong Trail, Section 5 rewards your efforts with camera ready vistas. Starting just below Parkview, the trail undulates up and down, via path and stairs — lots and lots of serious stairs — over Jardine’s Lookout (433 m), past the quarry and over Mount Butler (436 m) then down (stairs again) to Quarry Gap. You will need to allow time to get back to public transport — see Hub 4. Section 5 is a tough hike but well worth the effort.

      Walk up Tai Tam Reservoir Road from Wong...

    • 3B WILSON TRAIL SECTION 2 — PARKVIEW to QUARRY BAY
      (pp. 94-97)

      Challenging, with lots of hills and stairs, this trail climbs Jardine’s Lookout (433 m), aptly named for its far-reaching views to the north. The trail then dips down to pass the quarry, which is not its most scenic point. As compensation, after you pass the quarry the views are unmatched. Unlike the Hong Kong Trail Section 5 (Hike 3A) this trail does not climb Mount Butler, but it does crest Siu Ma Shan, which despite the “siu” (small) in its name is almost as tall as Mount Butler, about 420 m. You finish in Quarry Bay.

      Walk up Tai Tam...

    • 3C SIR CECIL’S RIDE
      (pp. 98-102)

      This is an excellent hike with a lot of variety. The trail first offers very good views of Victoria Harbor from a fairly level path, which is also a Tree Walk. After a brief stint uphill on a paved road, the trail becomes a flat path just above Causeway Bay and takes you to Braemar Hill (200 m); be sure to detour to the top of the hill for a terrific view. Finally, the path connects with the flat Quarry Bay Jogging Trail and ends at Mount Parker Road in Quarry Bay. It can be run in many parts. The...

    • 3D TAI TAM RESERVOIR COUNTRY PARK LOOP
      (pp. 103-106)

      Tai Tam Country Park is a huge preserve in the middle of the south side of the Island and contains three beautiful reservoirs. The loop circles the Intermediate Reservoir. Tai Tam Reservoir Road traverses the park steeply downhill from Parkview to Tai Tam Road, with views of the reservoirs and Shek O Peninsula that are simply beautiful. The rest of the loop is less scenic but a pretty way to go “off road” and a good link to other hikes. The park can be very busy on weekends, full of people making good use of the many picnic and BBQ...

    • 3E TAI TAM COUNTRY TRAIL
      (pp. 107-110)

      This versatile hike combines four different trails. First, Sir Cecil’s Ride, flat and easy; next, a steep climb to a path along a catchwater. After crossing back over Tai Tam Reservoir Road, the route over the Wilson Trail combines flat and easy sections with big climbs, and you can detour to the top of Violet Hill (433 m), where the view is unmatched. For the last leg, return to Wong Nai Chung Reservoir. Wonderful views without a killer workout make this hike a winner.

      Take the stairs just uphill from the gas station on Wong Nai Chung Gap Road and...

    • 3F WILSON TRAIL SECTION 1 — VIOLET HILL and THE TWINS
      (pp. 111-113)

      Violet Hill is a short intense climb up from Parkview along the Wilson Trail, to a spectacular 360-degree view. After you have had your fill of the landscape, continue over Repulse Bay Gap to the Twins, one of the most challenging trails on Hong Kong Island. We tried to count the steps (rumored to be 1,200) but ran out of breath. The views are among the best available, and a just reward for all your puffing and panting. Not up for the Twins? Your options at Repulse Bay Gap range from a quick return, to a long circle around the...

    • 3G TSZ LO LAN SHAN PATH and CATCHWATER to STANLEY
      (pp. 114-116)

      This is a alternative and more gentle route from Parkview to Repulse Bay Gap, where you can continue on an easy but very pretty trail to Stanley, or pick up the Twins or the Tai Tam Reservoir Upper or Lower Reservoir Paths; see Hikes 3F and 3D. A good part of the trail is a concrete catchwater; the rest is dirt and stone. In a few sections, the trail clings rather precariously to a hillside. It is tempting to recommend this hike for kids, as it is flat, but in many sections there is a steep drop off. Any children...

    • 3H LADY CLEMENTI’S RIDE
      (pp. 117-120)

      This hike has a bit of everything, stairs, flat sections, catchwaters, dirt, paving, open and tree covered sections, some interesting views, a Tree Walk, and a sense of history with some bunkers from World War II. The walk used to be a Bridle Path and is named after the wife of Sir Cecil Clementi, a former governor of Hong Kong. The lady had a reputation for being quite stuffy, even by the standards of the day. She would go to the library, located in what is now the Helena May, and rip out any pages of books that mentioned hugs...

    • 3J REPULSE BAY SEAVIEW PROMENADE
      (pp. 121-122)

      The Promenade is one of the few flat walks in Hong Kong. Combined with the Mills and Chung path, the walk goes all the way from Repulse Bay to the Hong Kong Country Club, just before Ocean Park. The views are magnificent, from close ups of boats and shore to long shots out over the bays to the shipping channel. Except for the stairs at either end, the walk is flat and perfect for jogging, strollers, family outings and people watching.

      By Bus:

      Any No. 6 or 260 bus to Repulse Bay

      No. 73 or 973 from Aberdeen to Repulse...

    • 3K CHUNG HOM KOK
      (pp. 123-124)

      Looking for a walk with great views but few tourists? Take a walk downhill to the end of the Chung Hom Kok Peninsula, partly on public road then on a road closed to all but local traffic. The end of the walk is the best part, as you travel along the point, with far reaching sea views and an old World War II bunker. This is a good one for a run and suitable for kids, especially if you walk down and bus or cab back up.

      By Bus:

      Take any No. 6 or 260 bus from Central, getting off...

    • 3L STANLEY FORT
      (pp. 125-126)

      Few tourists get past Stanley Market, but this hike takes you along the peninsula for unique views and some history as well. A long pull uphill on a public road, the hike is not bad for a run. The road has good sidewalks in the beginning and not much traffic when the sidewalks peter out, although the busses and construction trucks do zoom by. There are pretty views of the sea and Stanley. You can stop and rest at the peaceful Stanley Military Cemetery, containing many colonial and World War II graves. When you get to the People’s Liberation Army...

    • 3M TAI TAM TREE WALK
      (pp. 127-127)

      A sweet little path branching off from Tai Tam Reservoir Road just inside the park, this is a winner with kids. Markers identify trees and plants as the trail winds through a BBQ area.

      From Wong Nai Chung Gap walk up Tai Tam Reservoir Road to Parkview. Beyond the entrance to Parkview, as the road turns downhill, there is a gate and sign for Tai Tam Country Park.

      At marker T8201, the paved road heads down the hill, past a picnic site on the left and a BBQ site on the right, a clue to the popularity of the area...

    • 3N WONG NAI CHUNG TREE WALK
      (pp. 128-130)

      This walk, good for kids, provides surprisingly good views from a fairly level path, which is also a Tree Walk. The trail overlaps Sir Cecil’s Ride until it reaches Mount Butler Road; see Hike 3C.

      Take the stairs just uphill from the gas station on Wong Nai Chung Gap Road and make an immediate left turn. If you are coming down Tai Tam Reservoir Road, either take the path to the right between the bridge and the little park, or the steps just beyond the car park driveway. At our last visit, the signboard at the top of these steps...

  9. Hub 4 Quarry Gap
    • [HUB 4 Introduction]
      (pp. 131-134)

      Although somewhat of a challenge to get to, this hub rewards the hiker with energetic hikes and super views. Mount Parker Road (not accessible to cars) runs north/south or through the gap, intersecting Tai Tam Reservoir Road. Thus, while Quarry Gap (Tai Fung Au in Chinese) is the hub, the access points are Quarry Bay and Tai Tam. Many of the Hub 3 hikes end up in Quarry Gap, such as 3A, 3B, and 3C. You can start in Quarry Bay, include some hikes at Tai Tam Reservoir, and finish in or near Stanley or at Parkview. See Extended Hikes...

    • 4A HONG KONG TRAIL SECTION 6 — QUARRY GAP to TAI TAM ROAD
      (pp. 135-137)

      Not the most scenic section of the Hong Kong Trail, Section 6 is an easy walk (in this direction) and a good way to get from Quarry Gap to Tai Tam. The trail travels downhill along Mount Parker Road and Tai Tam Reservoir Road, around the Tai Tam Reservoirs, and then through some wooded areas crossing several streams, ending up at Tai Tam Road near the reservoir dam. In reverse, this climb up Mount Butler (436 m) is a popular training hike or run, with a difficulty rating of 5/5.

      Follow the Hub directions to Quarry Gap. Looking at the...

    • 4B MOUNT PARKER ROAD to BOA VISTA HILL
      (pp. 138-140)

      Boa Vista Hill (260 m) lies to the east of the Tai Tam Reservoirs within Tai Tam Country Park. The 3.5 km/2.2 mi trail travels along a rocky, downward-sloping path, and offers some charming views of both the reservoirs to the west and Chai Wan to the east, as it swings back toward Mount Parker Road, then climbs the short distance to the top of Boa Vista for fabulous views to the south. This route takes you up Mount Parker Road, itself a good uphill hike (3 km/1.9 mi), to Quarry Gap (Tai Fung Au), where you can pick up...

    • 4C HONG PAK COUNTRY TRAIL
      (pp. 141-143)

      Not well-known, this very scenic trail contours in and out of the canyons high up behind Kornhill, just below Quarry Gap. There are much better views than you would expect (or deserve) for a relatively easy hike. The walk is full of contrasts with views of dense city below you. Kids will like this one, as there are boulders to clamber over and streams to cross.

      Follow the Hub directions to Mount Parker Road and turn left.

      Climb up Mount Parker Road about 2 km/1.2 mi to a paved road that heads sharply downhill to the east. You can’t miss...

    • 4D QUARRY BAY TREE WALK
      (pp. 144-146)

      A tree-shaded visit with nature and history, this walk can stand alone for a short outing, or as an add-on at the end of another hike, such as Sir Cecil’s Ride, Hike 3C. Either way, it’s a pleasant surprise that is hidden almost in the heart of the city. Kids will enjoy this one, too.

      The trail is very clearly marked by a Tree Walk gate on Mount Parker Road about 0.8 km/0.5 mi up from Quarry Bay. It overlaps the last part of Section 2 of the Wilson Trail, and is marked with W distance markers; see Hike 3B....

  10. Hub 5 Shek O Peninsula (Tai Tam Gap)
    • [HUB 5 Introduction]
      (pp. 147-150)

      Shek O, a remote peninsula on the south side, has three of the Island’s most scenic and popular hikes, including the famous Dragon’s Back. There are plenty of sea views, Canto-pop singers’ mansions, paragliders, and seaside villages. This hub is a bit spread out so directions to the start are also contained in each hike description.

      Countryside Map Grid: 14–15 and 64 (Tai Tam Gap).

      The village of Shek O is at 16–17 and 60–61.

      By Bus/MTR:

      MTR to Shau Kei Wan; bus No. 9 towards Shek O

      MTR to Chai Wan and minibus No. 16M towards...

    • 5A HONG KONG TRAIL SECTION 7 — TAI TAM ROAD to TO TEI WAN
      (pp. 151-152)

      A long but easy walk, this trail has a dull start but finishes with beautiful coastal views and glimpses of seaside villages. This is a good path for a run. Beware, though, that at the end of the trail, you have only three ways out: up, up, up about 700 stairs, back the way you came, or by hijacking a boat to Tai Tam.

      The trailhead is on Tai Tam Road.

      By Bus:

      Traveling towards Chai Wan: get off the bus just after it crosses the Tai Tam Reservoir Dam.

      Traveling towards Stanley: As you come from Chai Wan, watch...

    • 5B HONG KONG TRAIL SECTION 8 (DRAGON’S BACK) — TO TEI WAN to BIG WAVE BAY
      (pp. 153-156)

      Known as “Dragon’s Back,” the trail traces the ridge lines of a series of rises on top of Shek O Peak (284 m). The stunning views of both sides of Shek O Peninsula, with fancy mansions, a golf course, beach villages, para-gliders, boats, and islands in the distance, make this one of Hong Kong’s most popular walks. The trail divides into three sections: first, the climb up to and along the ridge of the Dragon’s Back; next, very flat sections through the trees and along a paved road; last, down through the trees to Big Wave Bay (Tai Long Wan)....

    • 5C CHAI WAN LOOP (POTTINGER PEAK COUNTRY TRAIL) or CHAI WAN to BIG WAVE BAY
      (pp. 157-159)

      This route provides an alternative access to the Dragon’s Back (Hike 5B) and a pleasant loop on its own for a change of pace. Its scenic moments are few but impressive. You may choose to return to Chai Wan on the Pottinger Peak Country Trail or stop off at Big Wave Bay. For a longer outing, combine the hike with a visit to the Hong Kong Museum of Coastal Defense in Shau Kei Wan. The trail is a good choice for a run. For a shorter trip with more views per stride, you can begin at the Shek O Roundabout...

    • 5D LEI YUE MUN – SAI WAN FORT MORNING WALK
      (pp. 160-162)

      A gently climbing, little-known trail, this walk ends up at the Sai Wan Fort. The views of Lei Yue Mun Channel, the narrow entrance to the harbor, are unique and splendid. It’s a good walk for kids, and you could combine it with a visit to the Coastal Defense Museum in Shau Kei Wan.

      On Foot:

      From the Shau Kei Wan MTR stop take the exit to Shau Kei Wan Main Street. Follow the sign to McDonald’s. The temple on the left is worth a look. Walk along Factory Street towards the HSBC sign to Chai Wan Road, and left...

  11. APPENDICES
    (pp. 163-168)