Catalogus Translationum et Commentariorum, Volume 9

Catalogus Translationum et Commentariorum, Volume 9

EDITOR IN CHIEF VIRGINIA BROWN
JAMES HANKINS
ROBERT A. KASTER
Copyright Date: 2011
Pages: 305
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt284vr4
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Catalogus Translationum et Commentariorum, Volume 9
    Book Description:

    Considered a definitive source for scholars and students, this highly acclaimed series illustrates the impact of Greek and Latin texts on the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

    eISBN: 978-0-8132-1912-7
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-x)
    Virginia Brown
  4. PREFACE TO VOLUME I
    (pp. xi-xvi)
    Paul Oskar Kristeller
  5. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. xvii-xxiv)
  6. LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS REGULARLY USED IN THIS VOLUME
    (pp. xxv-xxvi)
  7. Greek Authors
    • EPICTETUS
      (pp. 1-54)
      GERARD J. BOTER

      The sources for the life of Epictetus are scanty. First we have the records in Epictetus’ own works. Then there are the ancient testimonia in other authors assembled by Heinrich Schenkl.¹ These are based almost exclusively on three sources: the Noctes Atticae by the second-century a.d. Latin author Aulus Gellius (1.2.6–13; 2.18.10; 15.11.5 = Schenkl, test. VIII–X), the commentary on the Encheiridion by the sixth-century Greek philosopher Simplicius, and the entry in the tenth-century lexicon Suda (E 2424 [2.365.24–27 Adler] = Schenkl, test. XXI).

      At the beginning of the preface to his commentary on Epictetus’ Encheiridion, Simplicius...

  8. Latin Authors
    • GREGORIUS TURONENSIS
      (pp. 55-72)
      JOHN J. CONTRENI

      Gregory of Tours was born Georgius Florentius on 30 November in 538 or 539 in Arvernus (Clermont-Ferrand) in the kingdom of the Franks. He was appointed bishop of Tours in 573, a position he held until his death on 17 November 594. Gregory belonged to both the old and new aristocracy of Francia. His family was an ancient Gallo-Roman one, which, on his father’s side, could trace its roots to Vectius Epagatus, a Christian who was martyred at Lyons in 177. The family did not rest on its senatorial laurels during the tumultuous sixth century when rival Frankish factions fought...

    • PLINIUS CAECILIUS SECUNDUS, GAIUS
      (pp. 73-152)
      LUCIA A. CIAPPONI

      Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus (Pliny the Younger) was born before 24 August 61 or 62 a.d. His father’s family was that of the Caecilii, his mother that of the Plinii, both prominent families of Novum Comum (Como) in northern Italy. His father died when he was very young, before he was fourteen, for he had as a tutor legitimus Verginius Rufus, a prominent figure in Roman politics, who was consul three times. He was adopted by his famous maternal uncle, Gaius Plinius Secundus (Pliny the Elder), probably in his will. As a result, he changed his name from Gaius (or...

    • PROPERTIUS, SEXTUS
      (pp. 153-246)
      DOUGLAS F. S. THOMSON

      Sextus Propertius (ca. 49–after 16 b.c., but before 2 a.d.) is the author of four books of elegies. He tells us that he was born in Umbria (Eleg. I.22.9 and IV.1.121), and modern scholars believe that Assisi was his native town.¹ Inscriptions of Propertii have been found there.² Moreover, at Assisi a certain Passennus Paulus, himself a poet of a later generation, claimed descent from our Propertius.³ Geographical indications in the poems of Propertius (I.22.9, IV.1.65–66 and 121–25) also support Assisi as the poet’s birthplace.⁴

      He claims to have worn the bulla or “locket” in his boyhood...

  9. Addenda et Corrigenda
    • PS. CEBES. ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA
      (pp. 247-249)
      GERARD J. BOTER

      The Addenda et Corrigenda are arranged in the order of the original article (CTC 6.1–14). As a result of research conducted for the article on “Epictetus” (pp. 2–54 above), further bibliographical and manuscript information is available and the doubtful commentary by Bernhardus Copius has been located. For a previous set of Addenda to ps. Cebes, see CTC 7.299–300.

      p. 3a6: Add:

      T. Banchich, Cebes’ Pinax, Bryn Mawr Greek Commentaries (Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1997); C. Florentin, trans. and comm., Le Tableau de Cébès (Montpellier, Vt., 2004); R. Hirsch-Luipold, R. Feldmeier et al., Die Bildtafel des Kebes. Allegorie des...

    • POMPONIUS MELA. ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA
      (pp. 250-255)
      MARY ELLA MILHAM

      The Addenda et Corrigenda, which are arranged in the order of the original article (CTC 5.257–85), consist of new material for the Fortuna, Bibliography, and printed editions and a new commentary.

      p. 259a12. Add:

      Other owners of fifteenth-century manuscripts of Mela include Lodovicus de Montecavaloro civis et notarius Mantuae (Vatican City, BAV, Pal. lat 1567), Johannes Baptista Almadianus (Paris, BNF, lat. 6236), and Aulus Janus Parrhasius and Antonius Seripandus (Naples, Biblioteca Nazionale, IV D 15). Two Quattrocento scribes are also known: Laurentius Abstemius (Lorenzo Bevilacqua, librarian of Federico and Guidobaldo da Montefeltro, dukes of Urbino) and Paulus presbyter Calensis...

    • SILIUS ITALICUS, TIBERIUS CATIUS ASCONIUS. ADDENDA
      (pp. 256-258)
      FRANCES MUECKE

      The Addenda, which are arranged in the order of the original article (CTC 3.341–98), consist of bibliography and two new manuscripts of the commentary of Domizio Calderini.

      p. 342 n. 2. Add:

      D. W. T. C. Vessey, “The Origin of Ti. Catius Asconius Silius Italicus,” The Classical Bulletin 60 (1984) 9–10.

      p. 351a48. Add:

      On the date of Pomponius Laetus’s edition (between 26 April and August 1471), see C. Csapodi, “Genauere Datierung von drei Inkunabeln ohne Jahr,” Gutenberg-Jahrbuch (1965), 122–23.

      p. 360b, last line. Add:

      The best modern edition is J. Delz’s Teubner edition (Stuttgart, 1987). There...

    • C. JULIUS SOLINUS. ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA
      (pp. 259-260)
      MARY ELLA MILHAM

      The Addenda, which are arranged in the order of the original article (CTC 6.73–85), consist of new material for the Fortuna and Bibliography.

      p. 74b45. Add:

      In his final edition of the text, Mommsen listed sixteen pre-1300 manuscripts of the Memorabilia preserved in British libraries and assumed that they belonged to the continental tradition. While this assumption is not sufficiently defined, certain pertinent information is indisputable. Two witnesses once at Bury St. Edmunds are now at Cambridge: Clare College, S. N., s. XI (fragments); Pembroke College, 87, fols. 109 (110)–120, s. XIII–XIV (excerpts from Solinus et al.)....

  10. INDEX OF MANUSCRIPTS FOR VOLUME IX
    (pp. 261-266)
  11. INDEX OF TRANSLATORS AND COMMENTATORS FOR VOLUME IX
    (pp. 267-268)
  12. INDEX OF ANCIENT AUTHORS TREATED IN VOLUMES I–IX
    (pp. 269-270)
  13. Tables of Contents of Previous Volumes
    (pp. 271-280)