On the Cessation of the Laws

On the Cessation of the Laws

ROBERT GROSSETESTE
Translated by STEPHEN M. HILDEBRAND
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2851s8
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  • Book Info
    On the Cessation of the Laws
    Book Description:

    In On the Cessation of the Laws, Grosseteste draws out the theological, christological, and soteriological issues implicit in the question of the relationship between the Old and New Covenants.

    eISBN: 978-0-8132-1986-8
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xi-xii)
  5. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. xiii-xviii)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-24)

    Robert Grosseteste was an unusual and exceptional man: from the lowest social class, but moving amid kings and popes, a scientist but also a philosopher and theologian, a talented administrator and successful teacher, a pastor devoted to the care of his flock but also a scholar dedicated to the translation of early Christian fathers and Aristotle, loyal to the Pope but fearless and bold in calling for the reform of the Curia. And what is more, he did not live a compartmentalized life and would have seen nothing odd about the various ways in which he spent himself, nothing odd...

  7. ON THE CESSATION OF THE LAWS
    • PART ONE
      (pp. 27-108)

      There were many in the primitive Church who asserted that the rituals of the Old Law together with those of the New Law must be observed and that there could be no salvation without observing them. Their opinion was rejected by the decree of the Apostles written in the Acts of the same Apostles and repudiated most effectively by blessed Paul in his letters to the Romans and to the Galatians. Because, therefore, they were able to support the error of their position with authorities as well as fallacious arguments—and by these arguments and authorities even now the faith...

    • PART TWO
      (pp. 109-154)

      The first textual authority from the Old Testament that we offered in the first part, as a testimony to the end of the Law—namely, from Deuteronomy, “The Lord … will raise up to you a prophet … of your brethren … him you shall hear [as you would me]”(Dt 18.15)—does not have the force of testimony unless it is shown that the man who was called Jesus is the Christ promised in the Law. Because of this, it will not be useless to show this from Old Testament texts.

      In order to make firm our faith, we must,...

    • PART THREE
      (pp. 155-193)

      Many truths can be shown also by reason concerning those matters which have been shown already by the authority of Scripture. And, when the historical truth of the Gospels is assumed, one can conclude that the man who is called Jesus, the son of Mary, wife of Joseph, is true God and true man, the Christ promised in the Law. The blessed Augustine, Gregory, and Anselm (most of all in his book entitled Why God Man) show more clearly than light that the one who liberates man, fallen into guilt and punishment, the one who leads man through the Passion...

    • PART FOUR
      (pp. 194-244)

      In the foregoing it has been shown, to the best of our ability, that the Laws have been now, in a time of grace, made void. As a consequence we should seek out the specific time that was determined, fixed, and signified, at which the Laws ceased and, as it were, lost their life by dying.

      2. It seems, then, that this time was the birth of John the Baptist, or the time when John began to preach, or the time when he died, since the Lord said, “For all the Prophets and the Law prophesied until John” (Mt 11.13). But...

  8. APPENDIX
    (pp. 247-250)
  9. INDICES