Receiving the Bible in faith

Receiving the Bible in faith: historical and theological exegesis

DAVID M. WILLIAMS
Copyright Date: 2004
Pages: 255
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2853pq
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  • Book Info
    Receiving the Bible in faith
    Book Description:

    The book should prove helpful to students as an overview of some of the issues involved, while more advanced readers will appreciate its analysis of recent scholars as well the attempt to integrate and adapt their insights.

    eISBN: 978-0-8132-1665-2
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-8)

    Christians have always regarded the Bible as the Word of God in a unique sense. Without forgetting the human character of the biblical witness, Christians make a strong affirmation that God has spoken in and through these texts. The holy books have proven central to Christian life in a variety of times and places; a renewed appropriation of biblical themes is at work in nearly every reforming or creative movement. We find a recent example of this phenomenon in the resurgence of Roman Catholic biblical studies since Vatican II.¹

    This singular place accorded to Scripture has caused the relationship between...

  5. CHAPTER ONE CLASSICAL AND MODERN EXEGESIS
    (pp. 9-54)

    While it is easy to speak of comparing classical and modern exegesis, actually performing such a task is far more problematic. The range of authors involved in mastering even one element of the comparison would be far beyond the limits of time and space that can be allotted to any one work. The only serviceable plan is to choose a few authors whose thought is both sufficiently influential and representative for them to serve as emblems of the broader situation. Further, since our primary interest lies in the ways the chosen modern authors have dealt with their status as heirs...

  6. CHAPTER TWO RAYMOND BROWN
    (pp. 55-78)

    Raymond Brown was a leading Roman Catholic New Testament scholar for over thirty years, whose significant exegetical labors on the Gospel (1966–70) and Epistles of John (1982), the Infancy Gospels (1977, rev. 1993), and the Passion narrative (1994) established his reputation across the scholarly community.¹ Among the modern writers to whom we now turn, he is the clearest exponent and most active defender of the approach and assumptions of mainstream twentieth-century exegesis. A Sulpician priest, Brown began his academic career at a time when Catholic biblical scholarship was only starting to take advantage of the increased freedom offered by...

  7. CHAPTER THREE BREVARD CHILDS
    (pp. 79-106)

    Brevard Childs has long argued that modern biblical studies must be reconfigured in significant ways if we are to understand the role and function of the Bible as Scripture. Where Brown intended to secure the practice and integrate the results of historical-critical exegesis, Childs aims to shift the prime focus of exegetical concern away from the sources or historical circumstances of individual texts toward their function and meaning within the context of the Bible as a whole. Though he ascribes an explicit and essential role to historical study, it is only when historical criticism functions in the service of this...

  8. CHAPTER FOUR JUAN LUIS SEGUNDO
    (pp. 107-129)

    Unlike Brown and Childs, Juan Luis Segundo was not a biblical scholar by profession, and his work includes a strong critique of contemporary academic exegesis and theology as being isolated from the concrete circumstances of the present day as a result of “the naive belief that the word of God is applied to human realities inside some antiseptic laboratory.”¹ This resistance to any separation between theology and praxis is, of course, characteristic of Latin American liberation theology in general. What causes Segundo to stand out among his colleagues are the extent and depth of his methodological reflections on the problem...

  9. CHAPTER FIVE HENRI DE LUBAC
    (pp. 130-173)

    Though belonging to an earlier generation, Henri de Lubac addressed many of the same topics as the other figures under review. He consistently displayed a strong interest in exegesis and the role of the Bible within the Church. The sixth chapter of Catholicisme (1938), on the interpretation of Scripture, contains in germ all that he would later expand and develop in Histoire et Esprit (1950) and Exégèse médiévale (1959–64).¹ These volumes have two related aims, one historical and the other constructive. The historical aim was “to disentangle the complex of false ideas long entertained by most historians” in his...

  10. CHAPTER SIX UTRAQUE UNUM
    (pp. 174-220)

    At this point we should remember that neither de Lubac nor any of the other figures considered were examined for their own sake, but rather for an underlying purpose that was constructive and synthetic. Now we must offer, with the resources available from those prior analyses, some resolution to the issue with which the investigation began. The traditional Christian approach to Scripture involves one set of affirmations, and the characteristic modern approach a quite different set. This clash poses no difficulty for those content to adopt one approach in toto and completely reject the other, but that is more easily...

  11. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 221-240)
  12. INDEX
    (pp. 241-244)
  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 245-245)