Education in Hong Kong, 1941 to 2001

Education in Hong Kong, 1941 to 2001: Visions and Revisions

Anthony Sweeting
Copyright Date: 2004
Pages: 698
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2jc026
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  • Book Info
    Education in Hong Kong, 1941 to 2001
    Book Description:

    It provides comprehensive coverage of developments in formal and informal education in Hong Kong from the end of 1941 to the beginning of the new millennium. As was true of its predecessor, each Part of this book is subdivided into three sections: Commentary, Chronicle, and Evidence. Such an organization facilitates flexible reading. Readers primarily interested in analysis, interpretation, and the identification of themes are likely to focus initially on the Commentary sections and to move, as they feel stimulated, to the relevant entries in the Chronicle and/or items of Evidence. Readers who seek either more encyclopedic understanding or detailed answers to specific questions may well wish to focus primarily or at least initially on the Chronicle sections, and then to search for substantiation in the Evidence section or for amplification in the author's Commentary. At times, some readers may wish to browse through the Evidence sections, reaching possibly serendipitous discoveries. Academic and general readers are likely to be particularly interested in Part I of the book, which deals with education in Hong Kong during the Japanese occupation, a topic that has received only very rare and generalization-bound treatment in other publications. The author offers insights into all levels of education. His conceptual scope incorporates many types of education - including the mainstream academic education, technical education, teacher education, special education, physical education, civic education, education that focuses on morals, that which focuses on culture, and the various sorts of non-formal and informal education.

    eISBN: 978-988-220-113-2
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. ix-xii)
  5. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  6. INTRODUCTION: VISIONS AND REVISIONS
    (pp. 1-80)

    This book is a sequel. Its rationale is, therefore, substantially the same as that which applied to its predecessor, Education in Hong Kong, Pre-1842 to 1942: Fact and Opinion. Like its predecessor, it attempts to present enough instances of information, ideas, attitudes, and skills to enable the reader to become his/her own historian of Education. If, however, at least in the beginning, this objective seems unrealistically ambitious, then it hopes to provide sufficient stimulus or, even, provocation to encourage the reader to enjoy browsing through it, reaching, perhaps serendipitously, her/his own conclusions about the latest phases in the history of...

  7. Part One OCCUPATIONAL HAZARDS (AND THERAPY?), 1942–1945
    (pp. 81-136)

    The Japanese occupation of Hong Kong remains an emotive subject. Most readers, today, will readily recognize the hazards that the people of Hong Kong experienced during these years. Familiarity with published histories, journalistic accounts, and folk-memories of the way the Japanese treated their conquered territories will ensure that dangers and risks in education, as in other fields, receive attention and respect. Thus, evidence about the regimentation of the schools, their students, teachers, and curricula, will seem almost predictable. Fewer readers, however, at least on first consideration of the matter, are likely to accept the idea that the Japanese occupation of...

  8. Part Two RECONSTRUCTION, EXPANSION, AND TRANSFORMATION, 1945–1964
    (pp. 137-236)

    The twenty years after the end of Japanese occupation saw the onset of many of the labour pains which led eventually to the birth of modern Hong Kong — though none of them was, in the other sense of the term, a contraction. During these first postwar decades, momentous changes occurred concerning the population, politics, the economy, housing, and, not least, education. Moreover, the changes were interrelated. Education policy and practice in this period will, therefore, be incompletely and imperfectly understood if studied in isolation. They will be better understood when viewed as case studies of efforts to reconstruct lives...

  9. Part Three POLICY, PRESSURE GROUPS, AND PAPERS ON THE WAY TO MASS ACCESS, 1965–1984
    (pp. 237-364)

    The proliferation of policy papers and of education-related pressure groups made this period distinctive in Hong Kongʹs history of education, contributing to an atmosphere in which mass seemed more important than quality, though neither the papers nor the pressure groups were themselves massive in size. Concurrent developments in the mass media provided opportunities for officials and for critics to publicize and, at times, to polarize their positions. It is, therefore, not surprising that these years witnessed the increasing activism of both students and teachers, eventually together with enhanced responsiveness to public opinion by Government officials. The pressure groups and the...

  10. Part Four PLANNING FOR A MORE CERTAIN FUTURE, 1985–1997
    (pp. 365-522)

    In the early and mid-1980s, the continuing and increasing decline in the annual growth rate of the population¹ and the change in the age-distribution of the population² facilitated longer term planning for education as well as the achievement of the targets identified in earlier plans. The reduction of pressure over quantitative provision also enabled some officials to pay greater attention to issues involving quality in education. Pressure groups and public opinion within Hong Kong encouraged this change in focus, while international trends, especially those emanating from the United States and the United Kingdom, favoured school-based initiatives.

    At the same time,...

  11. Part Five A MORE CERTAIN FUTURE THE PLEASURES AND PERILS OF POST-COLONIALISM, 1997 TO THE NEW MILLENNIUM
    (pp. 523-642)

    Probably the most important characteristic of education in Hong Kong in the years immediately after the change of sovereignty was the overall lack of dramatic or conspicuous change. Part of the reason for this was, of course, the reassurances involved in the continued espousal by politicians and officials in the PRC, echoed and amplified by the increasing number of their followers in Hong Kong, of the concept of ʺOne Country, Two Systemsʺ. Another part was the fact that, thanks to the pre-1997 influence of these followers, changes had already begun to take place.

    According to official estimates, as recorded in...

  12. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 643-654)
  13. INDEX
    (pp. 655-686)