Essays on Aviation and Travel Law in Hong Kong

Essays on Aviation and Travel Law in Hong Kong

Edited by Gary N. Heilbronn
Copyright Date: 1990
Pages: 192
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2jc1gf
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  • Book Info
    Essays on Aviation and Travel Law in Hong Kong
    Book Description:

    A collection of essays by legal professionals on various topics relating to aviation and travel law in Hong Kong, including pricing of air travel, airlines legal relations with travel agents, airport security, aerial crime and hijacking, and aircraft accident investigation.

    eISBN: 978-988-220-124-8
    Subjects: Law

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-ix)
    Gary Heilbronn
  4. List of Contributors
    (pp. x-x)
  5. AIR TRAVEL IN HONG KONG: SOME LEGAL ASPECTS IN NEED OF REFORM
    (pp. 1-30)
    Gary N. Heilbronn

    Hong Kong has many visitors and its residents travel a lot. In the late 1980’s, over 11 million travellers passed through Kai Tak Airport annually and the number is increasing.¹ Their travel provides substantial economic benefits to Hong Kong, whether they be locals using Hong Kong-based airlines to travel overseas, or foreign business people and tourists visiting and patronizing the territories’ transport, accommodation and other industries.²

    Air passengers travel to and from Hong Kong on a variety of different air carriers. Most are well-known scheduled international airlines but occasionally, smaller, obscure charter operators are used.³ Some passengers travel in First...

  6. LEGAL RELATIONS BETWEEN AIR CARRIERS AND TRAVEL AGENTS
    (pp. 31-60)
    A.W. Hughes

    An international airline desirous of marketing its services as extensively as possible, faces much the same options as any other international trading entity. Thus, in theory at least, it may set up one or more places of business¹, or appoint one or more agents² or distributors,³ in each country where it wishes to sell its services. In practice most sales of airline tickets are effected through agents appointed by the airlines, in return for a commission on the price of the tickets sold, although in some cases, an airline will establish an overseas office from which it sells its services...

  7. PRICING OF INTERNATIONAL AIR TRAVEL: A HONG KONG PERSPECTIVE ON RELEVANT ASPECTS OF INTERNATIONAL AND MUNICIPAL LAWS
    (pp. 61-90)
    A.W. Hughes

    The object of this paper is to consider, from the Hong Kong point of view, the various legal aspects of international and municipal law, commercial agreements, governmental and trade association procedures, which together make up the regulatory matrix of international air tariff control. Although the greater part of the regulatory structure, as well as this paper, applies to scheduled air travel, brief mention is made of non-scheduled or charter services.

    First, there is a consideration of the various acts of international law regulating Hong Kong’s past, present and future as a centre for international civil aviation so far as they...

  8. LEGAL OBLIGATIONS PERTAINING TO THE SECURITY OF PASSENGERS IN THE AIRPORT AND ON BOARD AIRCRAFT LEAVING HONG KONG
    (pp. 91-114)
    Amelia Luk

    Although there has been no universally accepted definition of terrorism, people all over the world would recognize what violent and senseless acts are terrorism. More precisely, terrorism involves the commission or threat, of acts of violence which are directed against the general interests of a particular country. Some are related to specific demands which would not be granted by the government concerned, in the absence of a specific threat, e.g., demand for the release of political offenders. Some are intended to undermine, erode or reduce public confidence in an established government. Others are intended to publicize the views of minority...

  9. IN-FLIGHT CRIME ON HONG KONG-BOUND AIRCRAFT
    (pp. 115-134)
    David Tolliday-Wright

    Hong Kong people are great travellers and Kai Tak Airport is a busy place. Despite inevitable complaints from tired travellers anxious to get to their homes, few residents can say, from whatever place¹ they have come, that it is not reassuring to see the familiar uniforms of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force. But can they be satisfied that this Force can adequately deal with complaints concerning offences committed against them whilst on the aircraft returning to Hong Kong?

    The author’s mind was drawn to this possible problem by articles appearing in recent years in the popular press in the...

  10. HONG KONG’S INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL LAW RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS PURSUANT TO OECD REQUIREMENTS
    (pp. 135-156)
    Anthony To

    The United Kingdom was a founder member of the Organization for European Economic Co-operation which was reconstituted in 1981,¹ and became known as the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).² The Tourism Committee is a subsidiary body of the OECD which was set up by the Council of the OECD to ensure continued cooperation in the field of tourism,³ and a number of decisions and recommendations have been adopted by the OECD in furtherance of this aim. Of particular interest is the 1968 Decision and Recommendation concerning Administrative Facilities in Favour of International Tourism,⁴ and, more recently, the 1985...

  11. AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION PROCEDURES IN HONG KONG
    (pp. 157-179)
    Cheonghar Wong

    It would seem that no matter what precautions are taken, and no matter how strictly safety rules and regulations are adhered to, aircraft accidents cannot be completely avoided.

    Hong Kong’s Kai Tak airport, with some 68,484 aircraft passing through in 1987 and 12.6 million passengers using its facilities in the same year, can justifiably boast of its healthy safety record. Until the incident at Kai Tak Airport on 31 August 1988, there had been no fatal aircraft accidents in Hong Kong since 1967. In the most recent incident, CAAC Flight No. 301 skidded off the runway into Kai Tak nullah...