Human, Apes and Chinese Fossils

Human, Apes and Chinese Fossils: New Implications for Human Evolution

CHARLES E. OXNARD
Copyright Date: 1985
Pages: 52
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt2jc1kw
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  • Book Info
    Human, Apes and Chinese Fossils
    Book Description:

    Human, Apes and Chinese Fossils: New Implications for Human Evolution The series will cover all disciplines concomitant to full University studies.

    eISBN: 978-988-220-182-8
    Subjects: Archaeology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. FOREWORD
    (pp. iii-iv)
    Charles E. Oxnard

    The University of Hong Kong and its Department of Anatomy have paid me the enormous compliment of continuing to invite me to present research lectures, over the years.

    These lectures have included, from time to time, many of the different lines of research upon which I am embarked: biomechanics of bone form and architecture, study of the deficiency of vitamin B12 in monkeys and apes, mathematical, physical and engineering methods in functional anatomy, relationships between morphological and molecular evolution in the primates, and evolution of differences between the sexes.

    Most of these lectures have been presented to the Department of...

  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. iv-iv)
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  5. 1 ANATOMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR STUDIES OF APES AND HUMANS
    (pp. 1-12)

    Until recent times there has been little argument about the evolutionary relationships of humans and great apes (gorillas, chimpanzees and orang-utans). For almost the entire span of time during which evolutionary studies of primates have been carried out, it has been confidently asserted that humans are separate from the great apes. This relationship is enshrined in taxonomy through the terms: Hominidae and Pongidae (Figure 1). It is based almost entirely upon anatomical studies at the organ and organismal level. The result is a view of the living hominoids that sees the living apes as the end products of a radiation...

  6. 2 SEXUAL DIMORPHISM AS A GENERAL PHENOMENON
    (pp. 13-41)

    The history of the place of sex in evolutionary studies is short and poor. In our scientific culture, as McCown (1982) has pointed out, it has been usual to regard the male as best exemplifying the species. Elliot’s (1913) review of the monkeys and apes counts the number of type specimens that are adult females on the fingers of one hand. Female specimens in museums are out-numbered two to one by males. Even when the female form has been examined, it is usually expressed as a percentage of a ‘standard’ form, the male. Attempts to prevent bias towards the male...

  7. REFERENCES CITED
    (pp. 42-46)