A Reason Open to God

A Reason Open to God

Pope Benedict XVI
With a foreword by John Garvey
Edited by J. Steven Brown
Copyright Date: 2013
Pages: 336
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt31nk95
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  • Book Info
    A Reason Open to God
    Book Description:

    With clarity and wisdom, Pope Benedict XVI sets out his vision for Catholic higher education in this first and only collection of his major addresses on the topic. What is the mission and identity of a Catholic university? What are the responsibilities of administrators, teachers, and students in Catholic institutes of higher learning? Where does the central theme of "love of God and others" fit into academia?

    eISBN: 978-0-8132-2148-9
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
    J. Steven Brown
  4. FOREWORD
    (pp. ix-xxviii)
    John Garvey

    This is a collection of Pope Benedict XVI’s addresses and writings about education and the university. During his papacy Benedict has devoted special attention to the “educational emergency” of recent years.¹ It is a subject about which he has a lot to say. Before his election he was a widely admired academic theologian. For twenty-five years he was prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the oldest congregation in the Roman Curia. The pieces in this book are the reflections of a finely tuned theological mind and a meditative disposition on that modern problem.

    They also address...

  5. INTRODUCTION: THE PROBLEM AND THE URGENT TASK AHEAD
    (pp. 1-6)

    We all have at heart the good of the people we love, especially our children, adolescents, and young people. Indeed, we know that it is on them that the future of our city depends. Therefore, it is impossible not to be concerned about the formation of the new generations, about their ability to give their lives a direction and to discern good from evil, and about their health, not only physical, but also moral.

    Educating, however, has never been an easy task, and today seems to be becoming ever more difficult. Parents, teachers, priests, and everyone who has direct educational...

  6. 1. THE RELATIONSHIP OF FAITH AND REASON
    (pp. 7-44)

    It is a moving experience for me to be back again at the university and to be able once again to give a lecture at this podium. I think back to those years when, after a pleasant period at the Freisinger Hochschule, I began teaching at the University of Bonn. That was in 1959, in the days of the old university made up of ordinary professors. The various chairs had neither assistants nor secretaries, but in recompense there was much direct contact with students, and in particular among the professors themselves. We would meet before and after lessons in the...

  7. 2. THE SYMPHONY OF FREEDOM AND TRUTH
    (pp. 45-68)

    I greet all of you with affection in the Lord, and I offer you my prayerful good wishes for a grace-filled pilgrimage ad limina Apostolorum. In the course of our meetings I have been reflecting with you and your brother bishops on the intellectual and cultural challenges of the new evangelization in the context of contemporary American society. In the present talk I wish to address the question of religious education and the faith formation of the next generation of Catholics in your country.

    Before all else, I would acknowledge the great progress that has been made in recent years...

  8. 3. EDUCATION AND LOVE
    (pp. 69-96)

    As a young priest Karol Wojtyla already had the idea of “teaching how to love.” It was later to fill him with enthusiasm when, as a young bishop, he confronted the difficult times that followed the publication of my predecessor Paul VI’s prophetic and ever timely encyclical Humanae Vitae.

    It was then that he realized the need for a systematic study of this topic. It was the basis of this teaching that he later offered to the entire Church in his unforgettable Catechesis on human love. Thus, two fundamental elements were highlighted that in recent years you have sought to...

  9. 4. PEDAGOGY AND LEARNING
    (pp. 97-150)

    The beginning of a new year, God’s gift to humanity, prompts me to extend to all, with great confidence and affection, my heartfelt good wishes that this time now before us may be marked concretely by justice and peace.

    With what attitude should we look to the new year? We find a very beautiful image in Psalm 130. The Psalmist says that people of faith wait for the Lord “more than those who watch for the morning” (Ps 130:6); they wait for him with firm hope because they know that he will bring light, mercy, salvation. This waiting was born...

  10. 5. THE CHURCH—EDUCATION IN FAITH AND COMMUNITY
    (pp. 151-224)

    For the third consecutive year our diocesan convention gives me the possibility of meeting and speaking to you all, addressing the theme on which the Church of Rome will be focusing in the coming pastoral year, in close continuity with the work carried out in the year now drawing to a close.

    The theme of the convention is “Jesus is Lord: educating in the faith, in the ‘sequela,’ in witnessing”: a theme that concerns us all because every disciple professes that Jesus is Lord and is called to grow in adherence to him, giving and receiving help from the great...

  11. 6. CULTURE AND THE UNIVERSITY
    (pp. 225-260)

    I would like to speak with you this evening of the origins of Western theology and the roots of European culture. I began by recalling that the place in which we are gathered is in a certain way emblematic. It is in fact a place tied to monastic culture, insofar as young monks came to live here in order to learn to understand their vocation more deeply and to be more faithful to their mission. We are in a place that is associated with the culture of monasticism. Does this still have something to say to us today, or are...

  12. 7. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND THEOLOGY
    (pp. 261-298)

    On this occasion I would like to contribute a few thoughts. Our time is one in which the experimental sciences have transformed the vision of the world and even man’s understanding of himself. The many discoveries and the rapid succession of innovative technologies are a well-founded reason for pride, but they are frequently not without disturbing implications. Indeed, against the background of the widespread optimism in scientific knowledge extends the shadow of a crisis in thought. Rich in means but less so in their aims, the men and women of our time are often conditioned by reductionism and relativism, which...

  13. CONCLUSION: CARITAS AND MISSION
    (pp. 299-302)

    What does the Church expect of you? It is the very theme on which you are reflecting that suggests the appropriate response: “New Disciples of Emmaus: Being Christians in the University.” After the meeting of European professors that took place two years ago, now you students are also coming together to offer the Bishops’ Conferences of Europe your willingness to continue on the path of cultural elaboration that St. Benedict intuited would be necessary for the human and Christian maturation of the European peoples. This can happen if, like the disciples of Emmaus, you encounter the risen Lord in a...

  14. INDEX
    (pp. 303-314)
  15. Back Matter
    (pp. 315-315)