The Art of Preaching

The Art of Preaching

SIEGFRIED WENZEL
Copyright Date: 2013
Pages: 288
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt31nkc4
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  • Book Info
    The Art of Preaching
    Book Description:

    Based on his wide-ranging knowledge of late-medieval Latin sermons from England as well as his editorial experience with medieval Latin texts, Siegfried Wenzel offers critical editions of five instruction manuals on the "art of preaching" dating from 1230 to the fifteenth century. Four of the texts are edited and translated for the first time; the fifth is re-edited from all extant manuscripts. Each of the five sermons is accompanied by a facing-page translation into English. The book aims to stimulate interest and new research in a field that still awaits closer analysis of the relationships among existing treatises and of their historical development.

    eISBN: 978-0-8132-2138-0
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. xi-xviii)

    All human activities that require skill and a certain know-how sooner or later beget technical manuals that, at whatever level, provide instruction on how to do things, from the Sabiston Textbook of Surgery to The Joy of Cooking and Seven Weeks to Better Sex. So it is also with preaching in the Middle Ages. Proclaiming the Good News had already been the work of Jesus and his apostles, and it continued as a central feature in Christian society through the succeeding centuries. But it was not until the High Middle Ages, the early thirteenth century, that separate technical treatises on...

  6. TEXTS AND TRANSLATIONS
    • I JACOBUS DE FUSIGNANO
      (pp. 3-96)

      Fusignano was a dominican friar of the Roman province, who held various offices in his order during the 1280s and 1290s and ended his life as bishop of Mothon in 1333.¹ His Libellus artis predicatorie (or similar titles; Caplan 115 and 220; Caplan Suppl 115) enjoyed much popularity: it survives in more than twenty manuscripts, including one of English provenance (O), and was included in several incunable editions of the equally very popular Manipulus curatorum, a pastoral manual written in 1333 by Guido de Monte Rocherii (or Rochen).² Like some other artes it begins with a scriptural verse that is...

    • II QUAMVIS
      (pp. 97-144)

      This and the next two works are anonymous. All three appear together in sequence in two manuscripts from England, where only the first has been noticed by previous scholars. That they are in fact different and separate works is clear from their preservation as individual treatises elsewhere, as well as from differences in overall conception, style, and even vocabulary.¹

      Quamvis presents itself as a short treatise (notula) on the art of preaching. It announces as its three parts (I) the introduction of the thema, (II) the division of the thema, and (III) the development of the parts. The parts are...

    • III HIC DOCET
      (pp. 145-162)

      The unknown author of this short treatise begins by distinguishing a collatio from a sermo and then announces that he will treat four main features of a collatio: (I) the introduction of the thema, (II) its division, (III) the subdivision, and (IV) the use of proof texts to confirm the proposed meaning. These topics are dealt with by other artes praedicandi as well, but in comparison with the preceding work (Quamvis), for example, Hic docet pays greater attention to such aspects as the mode of speech that appears in the chosen thema, the form and function of the thema’s introduction,...

    • IV VADE IN DOMUM
      (pp. 163-188)

      The opening sentence of Vade, quoting Matthew 9:6, introduces the image of a house, whose parts—foundation, walls, entrance door (with threshold, opening, key, and lock), windows, window panes, and roof—are then systematically applied to the standard six parts of a sermon. In its style and thought Vade is more sophisticated than its two companion pieces, as already shown in its consistent use of the house image for its structure. In addition, its author employs a refined technical vocabulary with such terms as clavis, sufficientia, and pedis positio,¹ which he discusses by defining them and explaining the definition’s component...

    • V JEAN DE LA ROCHELLE
      (pp. 189-240)

      Rochelle, a french franciscan and Paris master (died 1245), closely associated with Alexander of Hales, wrote a number of important theological works.¹ A Processus negociandi themata sermonum, beginning “Cum plures sint modi negociandi circa themata” (Caplan 31 and Suppl 31), is ascribed to him in manuscript P. It presupposes its readers’ knowledge of the parts of a scholastic sermon as they were expounded and discussed in many artes praedicandi including the preceding four works here edited. Instead of giving another systematic account of the scholastic sermon structure, Rochelle focuses on seven aspects of “negotiating”—that is, handling, or dealing with,...

  7. APPENDIXES
    • A. REFLECTIONS ON ARTES PRAEDICANDI
      (pp. 243-245)
    • B. THE LIFE AND TRANSMISSION OF LATE-MEDIEVAL ARTES PRAEDICANDI
      (pp. 246-249)
    • C. QUAMVIS AND RANULPH HIGDEN
      (pp. 250-255)
    • D. MODERN EDITIONS AND TRANSLATIONS OF ARTES PRAEDICANDI
      (pp. 256-260)
  8. INDEX OF BIBLICAL QUOTATIONS
    (pp. 261-261)
  9. GENERAL INDEX
    (pp. 262-268)
  10. Back Matter
    (pp. 269-269)