Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, Books 1-5

Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, Books 1-5

Translated by THOMAS P. SCHECK
Copyright Date: 2001
Pages: 427
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt31nksx
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  • Book Info
    Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, Books 1-5
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    eISBN: 978-0-8132-1203-6
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. ix-xiv)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-48)

    The history of detailed exegesis on Paul’s Letter to the Romans begins with the Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans by Origen of Alexandria, written around 246 and presented here for the first time in English translation. The work is Origen’s only biblical commentary to survive in a coherent form from beginning to end, though it has been reduced to half its original length in Rufinus of Aquileia’s abbreviated Latin translation (only fragments of the Greek archetype have survived). Thus it presents an exceptional opportunity to observe Origen’s exegetical method at work in interpreting a single self-contained book of...

  6. COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS
    • PREFACE OF RUFINUS
      (pp. 51-52)

      Although i wanted to touch along the coastline of a tranquil shore in my small boat and draw out tiny fish from the pools of the Greeks, you compel me, brother Heraclius,¹ to unfurl the sails for the high seas and, once I had set aside the task I had to translate the homilies² Adamantius³ wrote in his old age, you persuade us to set forth in our language his fifteen books in which he discussed Paul’s Letter to the Romans.

      (2 ) In these books, as he pursues the Apostle’s thought, he is taken out into such a deep...

    • PREFACE [OF ORIGEN]
      (pp. 53-59)

      It seems to me that there are two reasons why the letter that was written to the Romans is considered to be harder to understand than the Apostle Paul’s other letters. First, because he makes use of expressions which sometimes are confused and insufficiently explicit.¹ Second, because he stirs up very many questions in the letter and the heretics, especially propping themselves up on these, are accustomed to add that the cause of each person’s actions is not to be attributed to one’s own purpose but to different kinds of natures.² And, from a handful of words from this letter...

    • BOOK ONE
      (pp. 60-101)

      Paul, a slave of jesus christ.¹ We have already spoken about Paul. Now let us try to find out why he is called a slave here, seeing that elsewhere he writes, “For you did not receive a spirit of slavery to fall back again into fear, but the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry, ‘Abba! Father!’”² And again, “Because you are sons, God has sent the Spirit of his own Son into our hearts, crying, ‘Abba! Father!’ So you are no longer a slave but a son.”³ Why, therefore, does he declare himself to be a slave to people...

    • THE SECOND BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 102-177)

      But we know that God’s judgment on those who do such things is in accordance with truth.¹ We must expect and believe that God’s judgment in accordance with truth is not only on those who do the things which have been enumerated above,² but also on all who do anything good or evil in any way. But this passage is evidently making known that the judgment of God alone is in accordance with truth. For there are certain things which are committed where the deed is evil but the spirit is not evil,³ for instance, if someone unintentionally kills a...

    • THE THIRD BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 178-236)

      But if our unrighteousness confirms the righteousness of God, what shall we say? That God is unjust to inflict wrath? I am speaking according to man. By no means! For then how shall God judge the world? For if in my falsehood God’s truth has abounded to his glory, why am I still being condemned as a sinner, and not, as some people blaspheme us by saying that we say, Let us do evil so that good may come? Their damnation is deserved

      (2) Through nearly the entire text of this epistle composed by the Apostle Paul, it will perhaps...

    • THE FOURTH BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 237-302)

      What then are we to say Abraham found, our father according to the flesh? For if Abraham was justified by works, he has something to boast about, but not before God. For what does the Scripture say? “Abraham believed God, and it was reckoned to him as righteousness.” Now to one who works, wages are not imputed as a gift but as something due; but to one who does not work but believes in him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is reckoned as righteousness. So also David speaks of the blessedness of the man to whom God credits righteousness...

    • THE FIFTH BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 303-378)

      Therefore, just as sin came into this world through one man, and death through sin, and so death passed through to all men in that¹ all have sinned. For sin was in the world until the law. But sin is not imputed when there is no law. Yet death exercised dominion from Adam to Moses, in those who sinned² in the likeness of Adam’s transgression, who is a type of that which³ was to come.

      (2) After he taught the difference between faith and law⁵ and between those who are justified through faith and those who cannot hope through the...

  7. INDICES