The Questions on the Octateuch, Volume 1

The Questions on the Octateuch, Volume 1

Greek text revised by JOHN F. PETRUCCIONE
English translation with introduction and commentary by ROBERT C. HILL
Copyright Date: 2007
Pages: 450
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt32b24p
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  • Book Info
    The Questions on the Octateuch, Volume 1
    Book Description:

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    eISBN: 978-0-8132-1702-4
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. vii-x)
    John F. Petruccione and Robert C. Hill
  4. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xi-xviii)
  5. INTRODUCTION TO THEODORET’S LIFE AND WORKS
    (pp. xix-lvi)

    Born about 393 in Antioch, Theodoret owed his name to grateful parents, who were responsible for his entering monastic life at an early age. Since his famous predecessors in that school, if we may use the term,¹ John Chrysostom and Theodore of Mopsuestia, both pupils of Diodore of Tarsus, had been appointed to episcopal responsibilities in Constantinople in 397 and in Mopsuestia in Cilicia in 392, they cannot have exercised much direct influence on Theodoret’s formation. In 423 he was elected bishop of Cyrus, a city about 100 kilometers NE of Antioch, perhaps a “little backwater” of the Old Testament....

  6. INTRODUCTION TO THE GREEK TEXT
    (pp. lvii-lxxxvi)
    J. F. P.

    The present edition of Theodoret’s Quaest. in oct. is only the fifth since the invention of movable type. The editio princeps appeared in 1558, the first more-or-less complete edition in 1642, and the first fully critical edition in 1979. Our own editio minor improves upon this last.

    The complete text of the Quaest. became available in print in several steps. The first was the editio princeps of the French scholar J. Picot (Ioannes Picus).¹ In a note to the reader dated February 1, 1558, Picot explained that he had made use of a single very defective manuscript, whose purveyor he...

  7. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. lxxxvii-xcvi)
  8. CONSPECTUS SIGLORUM
    (pp. xcvii-civ)
    J. F. P.
  9. THE QUESTIONS ON THE OCTATEUCH

    • The Questions on Genesis
      (pp. 2-221)

      Previous scholars have promised to resolve apparent problems in holy Scripture by explicating the sense of some, indicating the background of others, and, in a word, clarifying whatever remains unclear to ordinary people.¹ And you, my dearest son, Hypatius,² above others have pressed me to undertake this task and insisted that the present work would be widely useful. Hence, although I am not in good health, I have undertaken this project, trusting not in myself, of course, but in the one who dictated this manner of composition for the Scriptures, as it belongs to him to bring to the fore...

    • The Questions on Exodus
      (pp. 222-345)

      How are we to understand “They proved prolific”?²a

      He did not employ the term as an insult, as some commentators have understood it, but rather to indicate their vast numbers. His meaning is that they grew so much that they spread throughout all that land. This is how Aquila and his school rendered it. The sequel also indicates this: “The land multiplied them”;b and a little later, “The more they oppressed them, the more numerous they became and grew very greatly in strength.”c

      What is the meaning of “Because the midwives feared God, they built themselves households”?a...

  10. Back Matter
    (pp. 346-347)