Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, Books 6-10

Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, Books 6-10

Translated by THOMAS P. SCHECK
Copyright Date: 2002
Pages: 358
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt32b2z8
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  • Book Info
    Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, Books 6-10
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    eISBN: 978-0-8132-1204-3
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. ix-xiv)
  5. PREFATORY NOTE ON THE PRINTED EDITIONS
    (pp. xv-xviii)
  6. COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS
    • THE SIXTH BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 1-59)

      Therefore, do not let sin exercise dominion in your mortal body to make you obey its desires. And do not present your members to sin as weapons of wickedness; but present yourselves to God as those who are alive from the dead, and your members to God as weapons of righteousness. For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace.¹

      (2) Above he says, “just as sin exercised dominion in death.”² Now, however, he has not said: Therefore, do not let sin exercise dominion in death, but he says, “Therefore, do not...

    • THE SEVENTH BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 60-131)

      Just as we have shown that paul brings up various kinds of laws in this letter under the single term “law”¹ and names various kinds of death under the one appellation “death,”² similarly, now we see various kinds of spirits being indicated under the one name “spirit.” Thus, he says in the present section: For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God.³ Surely he is speaking here of the Spirit of God. And again in what comes next he says, “For you have not received a spirit of slavery again unto fear,”⁴ in which...

    • THE EIGHTH BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 132-190)

      Indeed brothers, the will of my heart and prayer to God is on their behalf for salvation. For I testify for them that they have zeal for God, but not according to knowledge. For, being ignorant of the righteousness of God and seeking to establish their own righteousness, they have not submitted to God’s righteousness.¹

      (2) Both at the beginning of the epistle and in the preceding text, we have said that Paul speaks at one time on behalf of the Gentiles, at other times even on behalf of the Jews.² Thus, in the things just now explained, he made...

    • THE NINTH BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 191-253)

      In the entire preceding text of the epistle the Apostle had shown how the essence of religion has been transferred from the Jews to the [M1202] Gentiles, from circumcision to faith,¹ from the letter to the Spirit, from shadow to truth, from fleshly observance [M1203] to spiritual observance.² Moreover, he showed that these things had been described as going to happen in this way by prophetic voices. Now he sets about to establish the moral conduct and practices of this spiritual observance, to which, he teaches, the services of the worship of God have been transferred. He says,...

    • THE TENTH BOOK OF THE COMMENTARY ON THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE ROMANS
      (pp. 254-310)

      Therefore do not let your good be reviled. For the kingdom of God is not food and drink, but righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit. For whoever serves Christ in this is pleasing to God and approved by men.¹

      (2) I ask how our good can be reviled. It is good to understand the law spiritually and to avoid as unclean and defiled foods the godless and absurd doctrines of the heretics and of those who are zealous for false philosophy. For this is what is decreed by the spiritual law.² But suppose, for example, anyone from...

    • EPILOGUE OF RUFINUS
      (pp. 311-314)

      In dictating up to this point as we were able on the Epistle to the Romans, there has been expended a great deal of effort and time.¹ In fact, I must confess, most loving brother Heraclius, that while I desire to satisfy your wishes, I have nearly forgotten the command where it is enjoined, “Do not lift a burden that is beyond your strength,”² although in the others that we have translated into Latin at your insistence, or rather, at your exaction of a daily work quota, there was no lack of very great effort, as we sought to supply...

  7. INDICES