Psychoanalytic Terms and Concepts

Psychoanalytic Terms and Concepts

BURNESS E. MOORE
BERNARD D. FINE
ALVIN FRANK
JULES GLENN
LEO GOLDBERGER
EUGENE HALPERT
OTTO F. KERNBERG
SELMA KRAMER
SYDNEY E. PULVER
RALPH E. ROUGHTON
VANN SPRUIELL
PHYLLIS TYSON
EDWARD M. WEINSHEL
GEORGE H. WIEDEMAN
JACOB A. ARLOW
HAROLD P. BLUM
DALE BOESKY
GEORGE H. KLUMPNER
Copyright Date: 1990
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 225
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt32btp8
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  • Book Info
    Psychoanalytic Terms and Concepts
    Book Description:

    This book constitutes an expansion of the highly esteemedGlossaryof the American Psychoanalytic Association into a mini-encyclopedia that presents both historical and current meanings of the most widely accepted psychoanalytic terms and concepts. The format has been revised, new concepts and terms have been added, and previous definitions have been clarified and updated.

    "Anyone learning, teaching, or writing about psychoanalysis will find [this book] of uncommon usefulness and value. . . . The editing is superb, . . . the text [is] clear and concise, . . . jargon [has been] minimized, . . . and qualifiers avoid dogmatism. Early misconceptions (about female development and sexuality) are corrected, and the changes are consistent throughout the book. If one is building a personal psychoanalytic library, this should head the list of what to purchase next."-William D. Jeffrey,Bulletin of the Psychoanalytic Association of New York

    "The best quick reference available for psychoanalytic terms....Should be part of every psychoanalyst's reference library."-Psychoanalytic Books: A Quarterly Journal of Reviews

    "A book that offers well-written definitions and explanations of psychoanalytic terms. . . . There is much to recommend this volume to students, teachers, clinicians, and scientists."-David B. Allison,American Journal of Psychiatry

    "Transcends the danger of dry mandatory definitions with exhilarating short essays. . . These succinct summaries make this book a lively piece that will appeal to the experienced student as well as the beginner."-Carl F. Hoppe,Readings: A Journal of Reviews and Commentary in Mental Health

    eISBN: 978-0-300-16345-2
    Subjects: Psychology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-x)
    BURNESS E. MOORE and BERNARD D. FINE
  5. THE CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. xi-xiv)
  6. EDITORIAL NOTE
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  7. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  8. THE PROBLEM OF DEFINITION IN PSYCHOANALYSIS
    (pp. xix-xxvi)
    Burness E. Moore

    Every professional field has a special vocabulary to describe and categorize its observations, hypothesize about the interrelatedness of phenomena, and conceptualize explanatory propositions. These languages tend to develop slowly and somewhat haphazardly, by accretion. Systematization can be tackled only later, when a sufficient body of observations has accumulated and organizing and integrating commonalities have become apparent. In the meantime, some terms will have acquired a variety of meanings while other groups of words will all mean essentially the same thing. From time to time, therefore, professionals must take stock of the vocabularies they use and attempt to distinguish among the...

  9. PSYCHOANALYTIC TERMS AND CONCEPTS
    (pp. 1-210)

    The discharge through speech of the affect associated with the memory of a trauma. Freud originally thought that abreaction, brought about by hypnotic suggestion or by the therapist’s urging the patient to remember, was the mechanism for the cure of hysterical symptoms in the cathartic method. As he moved from the techniques of suggestion to psychoanalysis, Freud came to believe that the most important element of psychoanalytic therapy was the patient’s working through of resistances to free association. The goal of achieving abreaction, of bringing “a particular moment or problem into focus,” “receded into the background” (Freud, 1914). Today it...

  10. Back Matter
    (pp. 211-211)