Imago Dei

Imago Dei

EDITED BY THOMAS ALBERT HOWARD
Copyright Date: 2013
Pages: 144
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt3fgphw
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  • Book Info
    Imago Dei
    Book Description:

    Imago Dei will serve as an indispensable resource for those wishing to deepen their grasp of the theological bases for Christian views of human dignity, as well as for those who believe that Christ's words "that they be one" (John 17:21) remain a theological imperative today

    eISBN: 978-0-8132-2144-1
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iv])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [v]-[x])
  3. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-14)
    THOMAS ALBERT HOWARD

    The years following World War II witnessed much discussion about and reflection on the idea of human dignity. In 1949, with the Holocaust and the Nuremberg trials fresh in mind, the drafters of the new West German constitution, or Grundgesetzt, included in its opening article the statement that “the dignity of man is inviolable.” A year earlier, the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights referred to the “inherent dignity” of human beings and proclaimed that “all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.” In the 1960s and 1970s, numerous constitutions drafted in the wake of...

  4. 1 THE PROMISE OF THE IMAGE
    (pp. 15-38)
    JOHN BEHR

    That human beings are important is something we take for granted, and not only because we are human beings (or so we think—more on this later). It is a theme that has provoked reflection since time immemorial, and not only for us human beings: the question of the Psalmist—“What is man that thou art mindful of him?” (Ps 8:4, 144:3; cf. Jb 7:17; Heb 2:6)—presumes that no less than God himself recognizes our worth! However, over recent decades, the subject of human dignity has become very controversial, especially as it has come to be utilized as a...

  5. 2 TOWARD AN ADEQUATE ANTHROPOLOGY: SOCIAL ASPECTS OF IMAGO DEI IN CATHOLIC THEOLOGY
    (pp. 39-78)
    F. RUSSELL HITTINGER

    In his encyclical on ecumenism, Ut unum sint, Pope John Paul II made clear a desire that the Catholic magisterium might serve to enrich and deepen the faith of all Christians. The reflections that follow on Catholic social doctrine—a key focus of the magisterium in the modern age—are offered in this same spirit, inviting Christians of various confessional and denominational loyalties to think with—if understandably not always in full agreement—the Catholic Church, in the hope that “visible unity” among divided Christians might, in the fullness of time, become an actual reality.

    It is of considerable importance,...

  6. 3 THE AUDACITY OF THE IMAGO DEI: THE LEGACY AND UNCERTAIN FUTURE OF HUMAN DIGNITY
    (pp. 79-112)
    C. BEN MITCHELL

    What does it mean to be human?¹ What does it mean to be “one of us”? The emerging revolution in biotechnology challenges us to redefine human nature for the sake of technological development. Advances in genetic engineering, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cybernetics, robotics, and nanotechnology depend in large measure on our willingness as a culture to recast what it means to be human. In ecumenical collaboration, Christians from all backgrounds ought to be invested in thinking through and thinking well about these issues.

    Xenotransplantation and trans-species genetic engineering already have the potential to produce chimeras—living members of our species that...

  7. AFTERWORD
    (pp. 113-120)
    GILBERT C. MEILAENDER

    The three essays gathered here constitute an ecumenical conversation about important ideas that merit our attention. One speaker in the conversation draws on the Fathers of the Christian church (and especially, some of the Eastern Fathers); another draws primarily on the high scholastic thought of St. Thomas and on authoritative papal teaching of the last two centuries; a third draws primarily on the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments as well as Protestant confessional statements. Yet, they enter the conversation not only as representatives of different Christian traditions and communions but also as those who have one Lord, and...

  8. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 121-126)
  9. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 127-128)
  10. INDEX
    (pp. 129-132)
  11. Back Matter
    (pp. 133-134)