Adventures in Photography

Adventures in Photography: Expeditions of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Alessandro Pezzati
Copyright Date: 2002
Pages: 112
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt3fh8hx
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  • Book Info
    Adventures in Photography
    Book Description:

    Since 1887 the University Museum has been one of the leading archaeology and anthropology museums in the world and has sponsored field research in every corner of the globe. A key outcome, from its first expedition to Nippur, in modern-day Iraq, through more than 300 expeditions in the past century, to its research in fifteen different countries today, has been a wealth of primary photographs capturing both expeditions and excavations and also images of modern peoples on every inhabited continent of our planet. These vintage photographs, carefully selected from hundreds of thousands, range from mundane record-keeping pictures to glorious aesthetic treats, and they are in demand by international scholars and students and researchers worldwide. One of the most powerful of media to convey information about-and to advance understanding of-foreign peoples and places is photography. Soldiers, missionaries, merchants, and other travelers carried out early anthropological photography in distant lands. Field photography was extremely difficult when the Museum began its research program in the late 1880s, requiring the transport of a complete dark room and other heavy equipment. The Museum's intrepid adventurers sought scientific accuracy, with no artifice that may have obscured the realism of the image. An engaging narrative essay highlighting the Museum's fieldwork explains the contexts of the range of photographs from the Museum's Archives and the role of photography in studying human cultures.

    eISBN: 978-1-934536-22-3
    Subjects: Art & Art History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Plates
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Foreword
    (pp. xi-xiv)
    Jeremy A. Sabloff

    Since 1887, the University of Pennsylvania Museum has been one of the leading archaeology and anthropology museums in the world and has sponsored field research in every corner of the globe. The Museum is justly proud of the many kinds of treasures its expeditions have revealed. Obviously, the research has yielded many of the more than one million material pieces that grace the Museum’s collections today. These objects, which were made over huge spans of time and space, from periods that date thousands of years in the past right up to the present day, reveal the incredibly diverse material accomplishments...

  5. Adventures in Photography
    (pp. 1-16)

    Since its founding in 1887, the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has undertaken a program of fieldwork and exploration around the world that continues to this day. The collection of firsthand observations and evidence of human and material culture has been essential to the Museum’s mission of discovering and explaining the immense diversity and depth of the human experience, past and present.

    The science of anthropology grew out of the age of European exploration, discovery, and conquest that began during the Renaissance and reached its apex in the 19th century. Contact with a variety of foreign peoples,...

  6. Suggested Readings
    (pp. 17-18)
  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. 19-20)
  8. Index
    (pp. 21-26)
  9. Map of Museum Sites
    (pp. 28-32)
  10. Plates
    (pp. None)